Skip to main content

Table 1 Sociodemographic and life style variables. In bold are significant results (p < 0.05)

From: Associations between hydration status, body composition, sociodemographic and lifestyle factors in the general population: a cross-sectional study

Variable Women
Mean (SD)
Men
Mean (SD)
Difference*
Sample size (n) 114 128 p > 0.05
Age (range) 18–87 20–94  
Age (mean ± SD) 50.2 (19.7) 57.9 (18.2) p < 0.01
Age categories (quartiles) Freq Percent Freq Percent p < 0.001
 First quartile 39 34.2 23 18.0  
 Second quartile 31 27.2 33 25.8  
 Third quartile 22 19.3 35 27.3  
 Fourth quartile 22 19.3 37 28.9  
Education Freq Percent Freq Percent p > 0.05
 Primary and secondary education 39 37.1 41 33.9  
 Tertiary education 66 62.9 80 66.1  
Physical activity at work Freq Percent Freq Percent p > 0.05
 Light 43 39.5 62 49.6  
 Moderate 35 32.1 39 31.2  
 Heavy 31 28.4 24 19.2  
Physical activity in free time Freq Percent Freq Percent p < 0.05
 Light 14 12.5 18 14.2  
 Moderate 62 55.4 43 33.9  
 Heavy 36 32.1 66 52.0  
Sitting time per day (hours ± SD) 7.6 (3.3) 7.5 (3.4) p > 0.05
Healthy eating index Freq Percent Freq Percent p < 0.001
 Unhealthy 44 39.6 76 60.8  
 Medium 49 44.1 43 34.4  
 Healthy 18 16.2 6 4.8  
Last time drinking Freq Percent Freq. Percent p > 0.05
 Recently 51 45.1 35 27.6  
 Medium 21 18.6 43 33.9  
 Long ago 41 36.3 49 38.6  
  1. *We used a one-sample binomial test to assess the difference between sample sizes, Wilcoxon-Mann–Whitney test to assess differences in means, and the Kruskal–Wallis equality-of-populations rank test to assess differences between categorical variables