Skip to main content

Table 1 Characteristics of included studies

From: A systematic review of the effects of intimate partner violence on HIV-positive pregnant women in sub-Saharan Africa

No. Author, year Study location Study design Study participants Main Outcomes Alhabib Score
1 Bernstein et al., 2016 [49] Primary care antenatal clinic Cape Town, South Africa Cross-sectional 623 HIV-infected pregnant women aged between 18 and 44 years, from March to June 2013 IPV, depression, substance abuse and psychological distress 5
2 Hampanda, 2016 [50] Large public health clinic in Lusaka, Zambia Cross-sectional 320 HIV+ postpartum women from April to August 2014 Medication adherence during and after pregnancy 6
3 Manongi et al., 2017 [51] Kilimanjaro Region, Northern Tanzania Cross-sectional 1116 pregnant women attending antenatal care in Tanzania from March 1st, 2014 to May 30th 2015 Signs of depression during pregnancy 5
4 Matseke et al., 2016 [52] Primary health care facilities in rural Mpumalanga, South Africa Cross-sectional 673 HIV+ pregnant women Physical and psychological IPV 7
5 McNaughton Reyes et al., 2020 [53] Health clinic in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa Longitudinal cohort T1 during pregnancy – 1480 women seeking antenatal care from the health clinic
T2 (14 weeks postpartum) – 1154 women (78%)
T3 (9 months postpartum) – 1104 (75%)
Postpartum emotional distress 4
6 Nyamukoho et al., 2019 [54] Antenatal clinics in the Chitungwiza City Council outside of Harare, Zimbabwe Cross-sectional 194 pregnant HIV+ women at Chitungwiza city council ANC clinics between 14 June 2016 to 14 September 2016 Prevalence of antenatal depression 5
7 Peltzer et al., 2018 [55] 12 Community health centres in Gert Sibande and Nkangala districts in Mpumalanga province, South Africa Longitudinal cohort 681 women living with HIV were enrolled during pregnancy (8-24 weeks) and completed assessments at baseline;
32 weeks prenatally – 324 (47.6%)
6 months postnatally – 345 (50.6%)
12 months postnatally – 403 (59.2%)
Prevalence of prenatal and postpartum depression 6
8 Peltzer et al., 2020 [56] 12 community health centres in rural South Africa Longitudinal cohort 1370 HIV-infected women enrolled at 8-24 weeks pregnant and followed postpartum at 6 weeks, 6 and 12 months
Retention rate = 69.8%
Recruited between April 10, 2014 and January 30, 2017
Depressive symptoms 7
9 Reyes et al., 2019 [57] A healthcare clinic in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa Longitudinal cohort At baseline, 561 women diagnosed as HIV+ during pregnancy
At 14 weeks postpartum – 421 retained (75%)
Postpartum unsafe sex 5
10 Rodriguez et al., 2017 [58] Mpumalanga, South Africa Cross-sectional 673 pregnant women living with HIV recruited from April 2014 to April 2015 Suicidal ideation 7
11 Shamu et al., 2013 [59] Six low-income urban clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe Cross-sectional 2042 women attending postnatal clinics between May and September 2011 IPV during pregnancy and risk factors 6
12 Wong et al., 2017 [60] Guglethu Midwife Obstetric Unit in Cape Town, South Africa Cross-sectional 625 HIV-infected pregnant women initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) Depression, alcohol use and stigma 7
13 Peltzer, Rodriguez and Jones 2016 [61] 12 community health centres in Mpumalanga province, South Africa Cross-sectional 663 HIV+ prenatal women who were 20-24 weeks pregnant, recruited from a clinic RCT Prenatal depression 7
14 Ramlagan et al., 2018 [62] 12 community health centers in Mpumalanga province, South Africa Cross-sectional 673 HIV+ women, less than 6 months pregnant recruited from a clinic RCT – cross sectional data gathered from April 2014 to March 2015 Disclosure of HIV status 7