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Table 3 Main content of the mainstream and culturally adapted Healthy Beginnings program

From: The process of culturally adapting the Healthy Beginnings early obesity prevention program for Arabic and Chinese mothers in Australia

Timing and key content areas / Behaviour targets Main content
Mainstream Healthy Beginnings program [36] Culturally adapted Healthy Beginnings – Arabic speaking migrant mothers Culturally adapted Healthy Beginnings – Chinese speaking migrant mothers
Antenatal (third trimester)
Sustaining breastfeeding / best-practice formula feeding
▪ Breastfeeding guidelines
▪ Health benefits of breastfeeding and strategies to overcome barriers associated with breastfeeding
▪ Breastfeeding guidelines. Reinforce with support of community
▪ Benefits of breastfeeding and colostrum; Breastmilk production in first weeks.
▪ Family and social support
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters
▪ Breastfeeding guidelines.
▪ Benefits of breastfeeding and colostrum; Breastmilk production in first weeks; address concerns of not enough breastmilk for baby.
▪ Family and social support
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters
0–2 months
Sustaining breastfeeding / best-practice formula
Timing of solid food introduction
Promote active play ‘Tummy time’
Response to child cues: hunger, satiety
▪ Rapid response to women with problems initiating breastfeeding after childbirth, especially women who delivered by caesarean section
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding pattern
▪ Management of feeding problems
▪ Infant feeding cues
▪ Baby feed, play, sleep cycle
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Rapid response to women with problems initiating breastfeeding
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding pattern
▪ Management of problems
▪ Reinforce no other fluids or foods needed until around 6 months (e.g. formula and water)
▪ Infant feeding cues
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies; with increased information about what, why and how
▪ Baby feed, play, sleep cycle; infant crying is normal.
▪ Family and social support; sharing care with fathers and family, and emotional support
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters
▪ Rapid response to women with problems initiating breastfeeding
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding pattern
▪ Management of problems – addressing any concerns of milk quality and/or quantity.
▪ Reinforce no other fluids or foods needed until around 6 months (e.g. formula and water)
▪ Infant feeding cues
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies; with increased information about what, why and how.
▪ Baby feed, play, sleep cycle; infant crying is normal.
▪ Family and social support; sharing care with fathers and family and emotional support
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters
2–4 months
Sustaining breastfeeding / best-practice formula
Timing of solid food introduction
Promote active play ‘Tummy time’
Response to child cues: hunger, satiety
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding patterns
▪ Management of problems
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids at around 6 months
▪ Encourage mothers going back to work to continue breastfeeding
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding patterns
▪ Management of problems; describe signs that baby is getting enough breastmilk
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids at around 6 months
▪ Baby feed, play, sleep cycle; Sleep and settling techniques
▪ Family and social support
▪ Parenting; looking after mother and father’s emotional health
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters; introduction to family child health nurse
▪ Advice on establishment of breastfeeding patterns
▪ Management of problems; describe signs that baby is getting enough breastmilk
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids at around 6 months, emphasise includes water/fluids too
▪ Encourage mothers going back to work to continue breastfeeding and offer strategies.
▪ Baby feed, play, sleep cycle; Sleep and settling techniques
▪ Family and social support
▪ Parenting; looking after mother and father’s emotional health
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters; introduction to family child health nurse
4–6 months
Solid food introduction
Healthy food choices
Promote active play ‘Tummy time’ and no screen use
▪ Reinforce breastfeeding pattern, Management of problems
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids from 6 months
▪ Encourage mothers going back to work to continue breastfeeding
▪ Reinforce breastfeeding pattern
▪ Management of problems
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids from 6 months; visually illustrating age-appropriate food textures
▪ Learning to eat and making a mess
▪ Following hunger and fullness cues
▪ Encourage mothers going back to work to continue breastfeeding and offer strategies
▪ Family and social support
▪ Parent-child interactions; importance of play for mental & emotional development
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters
▪ Reinforce breastfeeding pattern, Management of problems
▪ ‘tummy time’ for babies
▪ Introduction of solids from 6 months; visually illustrating age-appropriate food textures
▪ Learning to eat and making a mess
▪ Following hunger and fullness cues
▪ Encourage mothers going back to work to continue breastfeeding and offer strategies
▪ Family and social support
▪ Parent-child interactions; importance of play for mental & emotional development
▪ Information about accessing free health services and interpreters