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Table 3 Contributions (%) due to composition and association effects to the difference in obesity rates between less- and highly-educated women for each model: Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2010–2014 (N = 14,577)

From: Factors contributing to educational differences in obesity among women: evidence from South Korea

Characteristics Less-educated vs. Highly-educated
Difference Model 1 Model 2 Model 3
Difference in obesity prevalence 18.3    
Overall composition effects   36.4 41.8 44.2
 Demographic   36.4 33.5 38.2
 Socioeconomic   8.3 8.3
 Lifestyle   −2.3
Overall association effects   63.6 58.2 55.8
 Demographic   13.0 11.5 9.8
 Socioeconomic   3.5 3.0
 Lifestyle   43.6
 Group-specific   50.6 43.2 −0.6
Total   100.0 100.0 100.0
  1. Note: N Number
  2. Less-educated denoted high school education or less. Highly-educated denoted college degree or higher
  3. Model 1 included demographic variables (age, marital status, and residential area) as independent variables
  4. Model 2 added socioeconomic variables (occupational status and household income) to the independent variables in Model 1
  5. Model 3 added lifestyle variables (smoking, risk from alcohol intake, walking exercise activity, and self-perceived stress) to the independent variables in Model 2