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Table 2 Sample HIV and transition characteristics by site and total

From: Combined effects of gender affirmation and economic hardship on vulnerability to HIV: a qualitative analysis among U.S. adult transgender women

 SiteTotal
RichmondSt. Louis 
Number of enrollees11819
Percentage of total sample58%42%100%
HIV Characteristics
HIV Status
 Positive27% (n = 3)50% (n = 4)37% (n = 7)
 Negative64% (n = 7)38% (n = 3)53% (n = 10)
 Unknown9% (n = 1)12% (n = 1)11% (n = 2)
Condomless sex in last 6 months
 Yes100% (n = 11)100% (n = 8)100% (n = 19)
 No000
Gender Transition
Self-reported gender identity
 Trans woman64% (n = 7)62% (n = 5)63% (n = 12)
 Woman/female36% (n = 4)38% (n = 3)37% (n = 7)
 Man/male000
Legally changed name
 Yes55% (n = 6)25% (n = 2)42% (n = 8)
 No45% (n = 5)75% (n = 6)58% (n = 11)
Legally changed gender marker
 Yes45% (n = 5)38% (n = 3)42% (n = 8)
 No55% (n = 6)62% (n = 5)58% (n = 11)
Initiated hormone therapy
 Yes82% (n = 9)75% (n = 6)79% (n = 15)
 No18% (n = 2)25% (n = 2)21% (n = 4)
Dressed as “female” always or occasionallyb
 Yes100% (n = 11)100% (n = 11)100% (n = 11)
 No000
Had any surgical procedures
 Yes000
 No100% (n = 11)100% (n = 11)100% (n = 11)
Reported none of the above hormonal, surgical or legal changes
 Yes9% (n = 1)12% (n = 1)11% (n = 2)
 No91% (n = 10)88% (n = 7)89% (n = 17)
  1. [a] Includes reported current use of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PreP) or antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV- or HIV+ trans women, respectively; [b] Includes wearing “women’s” clothing, make-up, and hair/wigs
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