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Table 5 Log-odds estimates (and SE) from a logistic regression model with obesity risk at age 28 as the dependent variable

From: Becoming obese in young adulthood: the role of career-family pathways in the transition to adulthood for men and women

 CoefficientStandard error
Constant−1.020***0.191
Obesity age 172.798***0.126
Female0.367*0.181
Pregnant at 280.373**0.135
Parental income
 Quartile 1ref. 
 Quartile 2−0.1050.130
 Quartile 30.0530.138
 Quartile 4−0.2690.151
 Missing−0.2330.129
Parental education
 Less than high schoolref. 
 High school diploma−0.0910.132
 Some college−0.2750.143
 4 year college or more−0.436**0.152
 Missing0.0280.224
Family structure
 Both biological parentsref. 
 1 biological, 1 step-parent−0.1260.131
 Single parent0.0250.101
 Other−0.2370.204
Race
 Whiteref. 
 Black0.367***0.103
 Hispanic0.0390.112
 Other0.3260.333
Career-family clusters
 UE-Pref. 
 UE-UC-CH−0.0850.237
 CO-E-M0.470*0.214
 UE-S-CH−0.1980.208
 UE-M-CH0.2950.190
 CO-E-UC−0.1800.236
 CO-E-S−0.1760.177
 UE-S−0.0350.214
Interactions Career-family clusters*female
 UE-P*femaleref. 
 UE-UC-CH*female−0.0080.347
 CO-E-M*female−0.659*0.300
 UE-S-CH*female−0.0310.277
 UE-M-CH*female−0.532*0.268
 CO-E-UC*female−0.2970.326
 CO-E-S*female−0.772**0.276
 UE-S *female−0.2200.379
Observations4688
  1. Obesity is the dependent variable and defined in the model as a dichotomous variable indicating 0 = not obese 1 = obese at age 28, this coding applies also for the independent variable obesity at age 17
  2. The career-family clusters are coded using a the following scheme: CO college education, E (stable) employed, UE unemployed or unstable employment, M married, UC unmarried cohabitation, S single, P = living in the parental home, CH = having (had) a child(ren)
  3. *p < 0.05, **p < 0.01, ***p < 0.001