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Table 1 Characteristics of the 15 food hypersensitive children as reported by their caregivers

From: Parents’ and caregivers’ experiences and behaviours when eating out with children with a food hypersensitivity

Variable Total (%)
N = 15
Gender  
 Male 8 (53.3)
 Female 7 (46.7)
Age group (years)  
  < 8 4 (26.7)
 8–12 3 (20.0)
 13–17 8 (53.3)
Diagnosis  
 Clinical diagnosis
 (by GP; Dietician or Allergy specialist at hospital)
12 (80.0)
 Self-diagnosis
 (by caregiver)
3 (20.0)
Time since diagnosis (years)  
 1–5 10 (66.7)
  > 5 5 (33.3)
Self-reported timing of reactions  
 Reaction starts immediately or within the hour 10 (66.7)
 Reaction starts 1–24 h later 5 (33.3)
Nature of worst self-reported reactions  
 Generally associated with IgE-mediated reactions
 (Includes at least one of the following symptoms: ‘Stinging nettle’ rash, urticaria, hives, itching or swelling of the lips, tongue or mouth, asthma, wheezing, facial swelling, breathing difficulties, anaphylaxis, collapse. May additionally include symptoms associated with non-IgE-mediated reactions)
9 (60.0)
 Generally associated with non-IgE-mediated reactions
 (Includes at least one of the following symptoms: vomiting, diarrhoea, sneezing, catarrh, hyperactivity, tiredness, stomach cramps, other digestive problems (e.g. bloating, constipation), eczema flare, migraines/headaches, aching joints/muscles, behavioural/mood changes; but does not include symptoms associated with IgE-mediated reactions)
6 (40.0)
Allergens  
 Peanut 6 (40.0)
 Tree nut 5 (33.3)
 Sesame 1 (6.7)
 Cereals containing gluten 2 (13.3)
 Milk 9 (60.0)
 Crustaceans 1 (6.7)
 Eggs 1 (6.7)
 Soya 1 (6.7)
Multiple allergens (≥2) 7 (46.7)
Treatment  
 Allergen avoidance 15 (100.0)
 Antihistamines 10 (66.7)
 Injectable adrenaline 3 (20.0)
 Inhaler 2 (13.3)
 Special diet (in addition to allergen avoidance) 5 (33.3)
Multiple treatments (≥2) 4 (26.7)