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Table 3 Long-term effect of unemployment at 28–30 years of age on self-rated health at age 42 for groups of individuals (n = 620)

From: Is unemployment in young adulthood related to self-rated health later in life? Results from the Northern Swedish cohort

  Logistic Regression G-computation Propensity scores, inverse probability weighting
Odds ratio Confidence interval Risk difference Risk difference
Education levela
Secondary education (n = 255) 1.45 0.60–3.32 0.074* 0.052
Upper secondary education (n = 112) 5.99 2.03–19.3b 0.345*b 0.372*b
University (n = 253) 1.22 0.59–2.49 0.039* 0.013b
Marital status
Married (n = 468) 1.58 0.90–2.74 0.069 0.072
Single (n = 152) 2.46 0.98–6.34 0.194* 0.211*b
Self-rated health 1995
Poor (n = 125) 1.75 0.65–5.11 0.109* 0.169b
Good (n = 495) 1.77 1.02–3.01 0.116* 0.089
Occupation
Blue-collar workers (n = 246) 1.56 0.74–3.25 0.087* 0.099
Low white-collar workers (n = 103) 1.51 0.49–4.54b 0.083*b 0.058b
Medium–high white-collar workers (n = 271) 2.29 1.04–4.96 0.169* 0.119
Gender
Man (n = 338) 1.35 0.68–2.64 0.060* 0.056
Woman (n = 282) 2.29 1.15–4.55 0.168* 0.155*
  1. * p-value below 0.05
  2. a Secondary education corresponds to at most 2-years of secondary education, and upper-secondary education corresponds to 3–4 years of secondary education
  3. b Logistic regression was used with fewer than the recommended 10 outcomes per variable for the least-occurring outcomes
  4. Analyses controlled for education level, marital status, previous health status (self-rated health in 1995), and occupation, excluding the factor for which the stratification was done. Estimates represent the effect on unemployed compared to employed individuals