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Table 2 Characteristics of agricultural intervention studies

From: Type and extent of trans-disciplinary co-operation to improve food security, health and household environment in low and middle income countries: systematic review

Study (Author and publication year) Country Participants (sample size, age, setting) Study design Intervention details (I = Intervention and C = Control) Duration of intervention (months) Outcome measured
Ayele Z and Peacock C; 2003 Ethiopia 210 households CSS (Pre and post) I: Animal husbandry: goat farming NR Food consumption, nutrient deficiencies
Belachew T et al. 2013 Ethiopia 2100 adolescents, 13–17 years, household 5 year Longitudinal study I: Food production NR Food consumption
Bezner KR, et al. 2010 Malawi 3838 children <3 years, household Prospective quasi- experimental study I: Intercropping legumes and nutrition education
C: Usual practice
72 Anthropometry
Bloem MW et al. 1996 Bangladesh 7341 participants, all aged, household Intervention study I: Home gardening NR Food production
Bushamuka VN, et al. 2005 Bangladesh 2,160 households Intervention study I: Home gardening
C: Usual practice
NR Food production, food consumption
Cabalda AB, et al. 2011 Philippines 200 households, participants aged 2–5 years CSS (2 group comparison) I: Home gardening (n = 105)
C: Without home garden (n = 95)
NR Food consumption
Faber M, et al. 2002, South Africa 208 participants, aged 2–5 years, community CSS (Pre and post) I: Home gardening and nutrition education (n = 108)
C: Usual practice (n = 100)
20 Food consumption, nutrient intake, nutrient deficiencies
Gibson RS et al. 2003 Malawi 281 households, aged 30–90 months Intervention study I: Multiple: Animal husbandry and home gardening (n = 200)
C: Usual practice (n = 81)
12 Food consumption, anthropometry, education, nutrient deficiencies, health
Haseen F, 2007 Bangladesh 370 households, all age participants CSS (Pre and post) I: Home based food production, increased purchasing capacity to improve food intake and nutritional status (n = 180)
C: Usual practice (n = 193)
24 Food consumption, nutrient intake
Hoorweg J, et al. 2000 Kenya 144 households, participants aged between 6–59 months Intervention study I: Dairy farming (n = 30) and dairy customers (n = 24)
C: Usual practice (n = 90)
NR Food consumption, anthropometry, income
Hop LT; 2003 Vietnam NR Longitudinal survey (LS) (pre and post) I: Programs to improve pig and poultry breeding NR Food consumption, nutrient deficiencies
Hotz C, et al. 2012 Uganda >10,000 households, community Randomised control trial (RCT) I1: B-carotene–rich orange sweet potato (OSP) vines with training (n = 293 children, 212 women)
I2: Education on female and child health and promotion of OSP (n = 179 children, 130 women)
C: Usual practice (n = 280 children, 213 women)
12 and 24 Nutrient intake, nutrient deficiencies
Jones KM, et al. 2005 Nepal 819 households, community Intervention study I: Home gardening and nutrition education (n = 430)
C: Usual practice (n = 389)
36 Food consumption, education
Kalavathi S, et al. 2010 India 150 household Intervention study (pre and post) I: Package intervention of nutrition gardening, livestock rearing and nutrition education 36 Food production, food consumption and nutrient intake
Kerr RB, et al. 2010 Malawi 3838 participants, aged < 3 years, households Intervention study I: Home gardening and nutrition education (n = 1724)
C: Usual practice
72 Anthropometry
Kidala D, et al. 2000 Tanzania 2250 household Quasi-experimental (2 groups comparison) I: Horticultural and nutrition education (n = 125 households)
C: Usual practice (n = 125 households)
60 Nutritional knowledge, nutrient intake, nutrient deficiencies
Low JW, et al. 2007 Mozambiqu 741 children aged 13 months, household Quasi-experimental (2 groups comparison) I: Production of Orange-fleshed sweet potato (OFSP) and nutritional knowledge (n = 498)
C: Usual practice (n = 243)
24 Nutrient intake, nutrient deficiencies
Miura S, et al. 2003 Philippines 152 women, household CSS (pre and post) I: Home gardening NR Food consumption
Murshed-e-Jahan K, et al. 2010 Bangladesh NR Intervention study I: Training support to farmers on aquaculture
C: Usual practice
NR Food production, food consumption
Nielsen H, et al. 2003 Bangladesh 70 households, women of reproductive age and 5–12 years old girls Intervention study I: Poultry production (n = 35)
C: Usual practice (n = 35)
12 Food production, food consumption
Olney DK, et al. 2009 Cambodia 500 households CSS (Pre and post) I: Home gardening (n = 300)
C: Usual practice (n = 200)
NR Food consumption, anthropometry, health
Schipani S, et al. 2002 Thailand 60 children, household Intervention study I: Mixed home gardening (n = 30)
C: Non gardening (n = 30)
NR Food consumption, anthropometry
Schmid M et al. 2007 India 220 participants, Child:6 to 39 months and mother > 15 years, community CSS (pre and post) I: Home gardening (n = 124)
C: Without home garden (96)
96 Nutrient intake
Sha KK et al. 200, Bangladesh 1343 participants aged <24 months, households Longitudinal study I: Household production and availability of rice and other fresh foods e.g. Vegetables, fish, meat NR Food consumption, anthropometry
Smitasiri et al. 1999 Thailand 15 communities, all age CSS (pre and post) I: Home gardening (seed grant) and nutrition and health messages (271)
C: without home gardening (247)
  Food consumption, nutrient intake
Wyatt AJ, et al. 2013 Kenya 92 households CSS (3 group comparison) Dairy intensification
I1: Milk production >6 l per day (n = 31)
I2: Milk production <6 l per day (n = 31)
C: No milk production (n = 30)
2 Food consumption
Yakubu A, et al. 2014 Nigeria 58 households, community CSS (pre and post) I: Cockerel exchange programme NR Food production
  1. RCT randomised control trial, CSS cross sectional study, NR not reported