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Table 4 The main effect of the intervention on the three secondary outcomes found to be affected by the intervention, both before and after adjustment for potential mediators

From: The Active for Life Year 5 (AFLY5) school-based cluster randomised controlled trial: effect on potential mediators

Outcome Main effect of the intervention on the outcomes (group difference)a Main effect (group difference) of the intervention on the outcomes after adjusting for relevant potential mediators
  Number Difference in means (95 % CI) P-value Number Difference in means (95 % CI) P-value
Time spent screen viewing (min/day Saturday) 2121 −20.86 (−37.3, −4.42) 0.01 2083 −16.26b (−33.26, 0.74) 0.06
Servings of snacks (number/day) 2121 −0.22 (−0.38, −0.05) 0.01 2112 −0.20c (−0.37, −0.04) 0.02
Servings of high energy drinks (No/day) 2121 −0.26 (−0.43, −0.1) 0.002 2112 −0.26d (−0.43, −0.09) <0.001
  1. All differences in means with their 95 % CIs have been estimated using a multi-level linear regression model to account for clustering (non-independence) among children from the same school
  2. The following baseline/school stratifying covariables were included: age, gender, the baseline measure of the mediating variable under consideration, school involvement in other health promoting activities, school area level deprivation
  3. In these analyses participants were included for each outcome if they had a follow-up measurement of that outcome; for missing baseline data we used an indicator variable as describe by White & Thompson [42], which means for each outcome participants are included even if they do not have a baseline measurement
  4. aResults are taken from the first publication assessing the effect of interventions of the outcomes at the first follow-up [21]
  5. badditionally adjusted for maternal limitation of sedentary behaviour and knowledge as potential mediators
  6. cadditionally adjusted for fruit and vegetable self-efficacy and knowledge as potential mediators
  7. dadditionally adjusted for fruit and vegetable self-efficacy and knowledge as potential mediators