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Table 3 Likelihood of Increasing Tobacco Smoking between 1999 and 2001

From: Smoking, drinking and body weight after re-employment: does unemployment experience and compensation make a difference?

  Frequency Sig. OR 95.0% C.I.
  Total = 3,331    Lower Upper
Employment status in 2000      
   Continuously employed 3,205   1.00   
   Unemployed with compensation 48 .06 2.23 .95 5.20
   Unemployed without compensation 78 .09 1.90 .90 4.01
Cigarette use in 1999      
   0 per day 2,606   1.00   
   1–10 per day 303 <.001 15.52 11.12 21.67
   11–20 per day 306 <.001 5.08 3.43 7.53
   21 or more per day 116 <.001 4.08 2.24 7.44
Education      
   Less than high school 210   1.00   
   High School 947 .74 .91 .54 1.55
   More than high school 1,359 .67 .89 .51 1.53
   Missing 815 .87 1.05 .60 1.82
Marital status      
   Married or partner 2,213   1.00   
   Single living alone 419 .63 1.14 .67 1.94
   Widowed, sep. or divorced 699 .06 1.52 .98 2.37
Income level* 3,331 .99 1.00 .93 1.07
# household members 3,331 .04 .88 .78 .99
Female 652 .47 .86 .56 1.31
Age 3,331 .001 .97 .96 .99
Race      
   White 2,197   1.00   
   African American 861 .29 .83 .58 1.17
   Other 273 .48 1.22 .70 2.11
Health Status      
   Excellent 885   1.00   
   Very good 1,255 .75 1.06 .73 1.56
   Good 943 .17 1.37 .89 1.98
   Fair/Poor 248 .56 1.19 .66 2.14
  1. * The income variable used was the total household post-government income created for use in the Cross-National Equivalent File[38]. This represents the combined income after taxes and government transfers. A Box-Cox transformation was performed on this variable to normalize it.