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Table 2 Barriers and facilitators to increasing chlamydia screening in general practice

From: What needs to change to increase chlamydia screening in general practice in Australia? The views of general practitioners

Barrier Probably not % (95%CI) Not sure % (95%CI) Probably % (95%CI)
Concerns about over-serving 74 (68, 80) 6 (3, 9) 20 (15, 25)
The cost of testing to the client 72 (70, 77) 7 (4, 10) 21 (16, 30)
Time constraints during the consultation 32 (26, 38) 6 (3, 9) 62 (56, 68)
Difficulty in talking with patients about sexual health issues 74 (68, 79) 8 (5, 12) 18 (13, 23)
The chance of getting a false positive result on testing 73 (67, 78) 16 (12, 21) 10 (7, 15)
Concerns that some pathology providers prefer swabs rather than urine specimens for chlamydia testing 67 (61, 73) 16 (12, 21) 17 (12, 22)
Patient's lack of knowledge about chlamydia 58 (51, 64) 9 (6, 13) 33 (27, 39)
Religion or ethnicity of patient 50 (43, 56) 19 (14, 24) 31 (25, 37)
Lack of a formal recall/reminder system for chlamydia testing 40 (34, 46) 19 (14, 24) 41 (35, 47)
Lack of support for partner notification/following up of the partners of positive cases 39 (33, 46) 22 (17, 28) 39 (33, 35)
Facilitators    
If there was a recognised national chlamydia screening program 4 (2, 7) 3 (1, 6) 93 (89, 96)
If payment was available for a practice nurse to discuss chlamydia testing with patients and conduct the testing 21 (16, 27) 9 (6, 13) 70 (63, 75)
If there were national guidelines recommending who should be screened and tested for chlamydia 3 (1, 6) 5 (3, 9) 92 (87, 94)
If there was an incentive payment to GPs for each chlamydia testing performed 9 (6, 13) 7 (4, 11) 83 (78, 88)
If GPs had more knowledge on how to manage chlamydia infected patients 36 (30, 43) 13 (9, 18) 50 (43, 56)
If there was an organised chlamydia education program for the general public 4 (2, 8) 5 (3, 9) 90 (85, 93)
If there was a recall/reminder system 10 (6, 14) 13 (9, 17) 77 (71, 82)
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