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Table 5 Predictors of preventive behavior regarding Q fever

From: Q fever in the Netherlands: public perceptions and behavioral responses in three different epidemiological regions: a follow-up study

  % of respondents that took one or more preventive measures Oddsratio (95%-CI)§
Univariate Multivariate
Sex   
 Male 26.7 1.0 1.0
 Female 32.6 1.3 (1.0-1.7) 1.4 (1.1-1.8)
Age    
 18-30 yrs 17.9 1.0 1.0
 30-50 yrs 27.4 1.7 (1.2-2.6) 1.6 (1.1-2.5)
 < 50 yrs 37.0 2.7 (1.8-4.0) 2.0 (1.3-3.1)
Contact with disease   
 No 29.5 1.0 1.0
 Yes# 75.0 7.2 (1.4-35.7) 5.4 (1.0-28.1)
Level of knowledge   
 0-3 items corectly answered 25.8 1.0 1.0
 4-7 items correctly answered 37.7 1.7 (1.4-2.2) 1.6 (1.2-2.1)
Perceived severity    
 Low perceived severity 21.4 1.0 1.0
 High perceived severity 36.9 2.1 (1.7-2.8) 1.6 (1.2-2.1)
Level of anxiety    
 Low perceived anxiety 17.1 1.0 1.0
 High perceived anxiety 39.1 3.1 (2.4-4.1) 2.3 (1.7-3.1)
Perceived efficacy of measures   
 Low perceived efficacy 22.2 1.0 1.0
 High perceived efficacy 37.3 2.1 (1.6-2.7) 1.7 (1.3-2.2)
Perceived self-efficacy   
 Low perceived self-efficacy 22.4 1.0 1.0
 High perceived self-efficacy 36.2 2.0 (1.5-2.5) 1.4 (1.1-1.9)
  1. §95%-CI 95% confidence interval; #had Q fever themselves or someone in their household.
  2. The following determinant are not included in this table, because they were not significant in the multivariate model (although they were univariate a significant predictor of preventive behaviour); education, ethnicity, employment status, marital status, and intention.
  3. The following determinants were univariate not a significant predictor of taking preventive measures regarding Q fever: having children <18 years in household and perceived vulnerability (2 items).