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Table 6 Partner's relationship satisfaction as a buffer for women.

From: The buffering effect of relationship satisfaction on emotional distress in couples

Relationship satisfaction (partner's) Self-esteem (SD-scored) First time motherhood (0,1) Education (SD-scored) Social support (SD-scored) Relationship satisfaction (SD-scored) Family income (SD-scored) Unemployment (0,1)
Low -0.38 (-0.43,-0.33) 0.35 (0.23, 0.47) -0.14 (-0.20,-0.08) -0.15 (-0.20,-0.10) -0.35 (-0.38,-0.31) -0.03 (-0.09, 0.03) 0.29 (0.07, 0.52)
Moderate -0.35 (-0.37,-0.34) 0.24 (0.21, 0.28) -0.08 (-0.10,-0.06) -0.08 (-0.10,-0.06) -0.31 (-0.33,-0.29) -0.11 (-0.13,-0.09) 0.34 (0.25, 0.42)
High -0.29 (-0.30,-0.28) 0.13 (0.11, 0.14) -0.05 (-0.06,-0.05) -0.06 (-0.07,-0.05) -0.25 (-0.26,-0.24) -0.09 (-0.10,-0.08) 0.25 (0.21, 0.29)
  1. Significant interaction effects (p < 0.001) between the partner's relationship satisfaction and seven predictors on women's emotional distress. Main effects (b (95% CI)) for various strata with low, moderate, and high relationship satisfaction
  2. No significant interaction effect (p > 0.001) was found for 'Somatic disease X Partner's relationship satisfaction' 'Partner's self-esteem X Partner's relationship satisfaction', 'Partner's unemployment X Partner's relationship satisfaction', Partner's somatic disease X Partner's relationship satisfaction', 'Partner's education X Partner's relationship satisfaction', 'Partner's social support X Partner's relationship satisfaction', 'Partner's distress X Partner's relationship satisfaction'