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Table 3 Prevalence and odds ratios of vegetable and fruit breaks for all schools and by subgroup

From: Effectiveness of a multi-strategy intervention in increasing the implementation of vegetable and fruit breaks by Australian primary schools: a non-randomized controlled trial

  Prevalence of vegetable and fruit breaksa Odds Ratio (OR) p-value
  Intervention Comparison Intervention Comparison  
  n (%) n (%) (95 % CI)   
  Baseline Follow-up Baseline Follow-up    
All Schools 195 (50.3) 318 (82.0) 116 (45.4) 157 (60.9) 2.36 (1.60-3.49) 1 <0.001*
School Type        
· Government 152 (51.0) 252 (84.6) 89 (45.0) 125 (62.8) 2.52 (1.60-3.97) 1 <0.001*
· Non-Government 43 (47.8) 66 (73.3) 27 (45.8) 32 (54.2) 2.14 (0.98-4.68) 1 0.057
School size        
· Small 76 (42.2) 138 (76.7) 34 (40.5) 51 (60.0) 2.0 (1.08-3.72) 1 0.029*
· Medium 94 (58.8) 140 (87.5) 57 (45.6) 74 (64.4) 2.68 (1.44-4.97) 1 0.002*
· Large 23 (52.3) 36 (81.8) 18 (39.1) 26 (56.5) 2.03 (0.69-6.00) 1 0.200
ARIA        
· Rural 55 (36.0) 118 (77.1) 29 (50.9) 42 (72.4) 2.55 (1.24-5.26) 1 0.011*
· Urban 140 (59.6) 200 (85.1) 87 (43.5) 115 (57.5) 2.13 (1.30-3.48) 1 0.003*
SEIFA        
· Low 136 (47.2) 234 (81.3) 70 (47.0) 97 (65.1) 2.30 (1.43- 3.71) 1 <0.001*
· High 59 (59.0) 84 (84.0) 46 (42.2) 60 (55.1) 2.18 (1.08-4.40) 1 0.031*
  1. a A time in class for children to consume a piece of vegetable or fruit they had brought from home; * Significant where alpha = 0.05; ARIA, Accessibility/Remoteness Index of Australia; CI, Confidence Interval; SEIFA, Socio-Economic Indexes For Australia.