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Table 2 Characteristics of participants in each study

From: Explaining the effect on food selection of altering availability: two experimental studies on the role of relative preferences

   Study 1 Study 2
Gender [% (n)] Male 48.7 (963) 50.2 (541)
Female 51.2 (1011) 49.8 (537)
Other 0.1 (2) 0 (0)
Age Mean (s.d.) 61.4 (11.4) a 47.3 (16.9)
Education [% (n)] Lower (Up to 1 A Level) 49.7 (982) 50.1 (540)
Higher (2 A Levels or higher) 50.3 (994) 49.9 (538)
Income [% (n)] Up to £17,499 24.1 (476) 23.9 (258)
£17,500-£29,999 26.2 (518) 21.2 (228)
£30,000-£49,999 26.6 (526) 27.6 (297)
£50,000 +  17.2 (339) 20.2 (218)
Prefer not to say / missing 5.9 (117) 7.1 (77)
Occupational groupb [% (n)] A&B 35.3 (697) -
C1&C2 42.4 (837) -
D&E 22.1 (436) -
Missing 0.3 (6) -
Ethnic group [% (n)] White 95.9 (1894) 94.1 (1014)
Other 2.8 (56) 5.7 (61)
Missing 1.3 (26) 0.3 (3)
BMI group [% (n)] Under 25 36.0 (711) 41.9 (452)
25–30 35.0 (692) 28.2 (304)
30 +  20.6 (407) 20.1 (217)
Missing 8.4 (166) 9.7 (105)
Hungerc Mean (s.d.) 0.31 (1.28) a 0.50 (1.30)
Total participants N 1976 1078
  1. a Of the 1976 participants in Study 1, eight did not report age and six did not report hunger
  2. bOccupational group was not collected in Study 2. A&B: higher managerial and professional; C1&C2: white collar and skilled manual; and D&E: semi-skilled and unskilled manual
  3. cHunger was self-reported on a 7-pt scale from “Very hungry” (3) to “Very full” (-3)