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Table 3 Changes at work in a 7-year follow-up of patients with exhaustion disorder

From: Self-reported changes in work situation – a cross-sectional study of patients 7 years after treatment for stress-related exhaustion

  Change of workplace n (%) p Change of work tasks n (%) p Reduced working hours n (%) p
yes no yes no yes No
Sex    0.32    0.03b    0.001
 women 64 (45%) 79 (55%)   52 (37%) 89 (63%)   33 (31%) 75 (69%)  
 men 27 (53%) 24 (47%)   28 (55%) 23 (45%)   2 (4%) 45 (96%)  
Age    0.73    0.85    0.68
  < 40 years 10 (44%) 13 (56%)   10 (44%) 13 (56%)   4 (19%) 17 (81%)  
  ≥ 40 years 81 (47%) 90 (53%)   70 (41%) 99 (59%)   31 (23%) 103 (77%)  
Marital statusa    0.62    0.06    0.42
 married/living together 66 (46%) 78 (54%)   54 (38%) 89 (62%)   29 (24%) 91 (76%)  
 single/other 24 (50%) 24 (50%)   25 (53%) 22 (47%)   6 (18%) 28 (82%)  
Educationa    0.83    0.56    0.95
 lower 27 (46%) 32 (54%)   26 (45%) 32 (55%)   10 (22%) 35 (78%)  
 higher 64 (47%) 71 (53%)   54 (40%) 80 (60%)   25 (23%) 85 (77%)  
Comorbidity
SMBQr    0.32    0.14    0.36
   < 4.39 72 (51%) 68 (49%)   58 (42%) 81 (58%)   25 (21%) 96 (79%)  
   ≥ 4.40 17 (43%) 23 (57%)   22 (55%) 18 (45%)   7 (29%) 17 (71%)  
  1. Analyses for each group (change of workplace and change of work tasks) were performed to explore whether there were any significant differences between the groups in terms of sex, age, marital status, level of education, and symptoms of exhaustion disorder. Pearson’s chi-square was used for all tests, and p < 0.05 was considered to be significant
  2. SMBQ Shirom-Melamed Burnout Questionnaire Rasch score
  3. aBaseline data
  4. bAfter the Holm-Bonferroni correction the difference between men and women was no longer significant