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Table 3 Associations between stress profiles based on criterion A or B and the incidence of turnover

From: Occupational stress and the risk of turnover: a large prospective cohort study of employees in Japan

 HR (95% CI) 
Crude modelAge-adjusted modelaFully-adjusted modelb%PARc
Criterion Ae
 Men (n = 3892)
  High stress4.80(2.94, 7.83)*4.94(3.02, 8.07)*3.32(1.99, 5.56)*8.1%
  Others1.00 1.00 1.00  
Women (n = 5765)
 High stress1.50(1.27, 1.76)*1.57(1.33, 1.84)*1.54(1.31, 1.82)*7.9%
 Others1.00 1.00 1.00  
Criterion Be
 Men (n = 3892)
  High stress3.13(1.46, 6.72)*3.26(1.52, 7.00)*1.95(0.89, 4.26)*1.9%
  Others1.00 1.00 1.00  
Women (n = 5765)
 High stress1.22(0.93, 1.58)1.45(1.11, 1.88)*1.39(1.07, 1.80)*2.3%
 Others1.00 1.00 1.00  
  1. HR Hazard ratio; CI confidence interval; PAR Population-attributable risk. *p < 0.05
  2. aAdjusted for age
  3. bAdjusted for age, length of service, job type, and position
  4. cPAR was calculated with the observed HR of fully-adjusted model
  5. eCriterion A is defined as the highest level of stress response as measured via the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (cutoff 77) and criterion B is defined as a moderate or higher level of stress response (cutoff 63), along with having the highest job stressors (or lowest social support in the workplace) (cutoff 76), according to the Stress Check Program manual. It should be noted that there is overlap in the distribution of criteria A and B
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