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Table 5 Summary model of factors associated with pay for PrEP

From: Low willingness to pay for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among men who have sex with men (MSM) in China

ItemsPayaPay $283b
ORm (95% CI)p valueORm (95% CI)p value
Health status and service utilization
 Overall disclosure of sexual orientation to health professionals 0.347N.A.
HIV-related characteristics
 HIV literacy scale1.12 (1.00, 1.25)*0.044N.A.
 HIV disclosure scale to sexual partners 0.240N.A.
PrEP-related cognition
 PrEP awareness scale1.60 (1.10, 2.33)*0.0151.35 (0.96, 1.90)†0.080
 PrEP acceptability scale1.11 (1.00, 1.24)*0.0461.19 (1.06, 1.33)**0.002
 Perceived adherence to PrEP scale 0.429 0.247
 Perceived PrEP benefit in reducing condom useN.A1.28 (1.07, 1.54)**0.009
  1. P < 0.10, *P < 0.05, **P < 0.01, ***P < 0.001;
  2. PrEP Pre-exposure prophylaxis;
  3. ORm multivariate odds ratio;
  4. a Four significant background variables (age, marital status, personal monthly income, and age of first homosexual intercourse) were forced entered in the first step, then six variables (overall disclosure of sexual orientation to health professionals, HIV literacy scale, HIV disclosure scale to sexual partners, PrEP awareness scale, PrEP acceptability scale, and perceived adherence to PrEP scale) were put in the multivariate model. The Forward Stepwise (Wald) Method ((Entry: p < 0.05, exclude: p > 0.10)) was used to select variables in this model;
  5. b Four variabls (including PrEP awareness scale, PrEP acceptability scale, efficacy scale of keeping adherence to PrEP, and perceived benefits of PrEP in reducing condom use) were put in the multivariate model, and the Forward Stepwise (Wald) Method ((Entry: p < 0.05, exclude: p > 0.10)) was used to select variables in this model;
  6. N.A not applicable to this model;