Skip to main content

Table 1 Participant demographics

From: Social inclusion and exclusion of people with mental illness in Timor-Leste: a qualitative investigation with multiple stakeholders

  People with mental illness Family members Service providers Decision makers Civil society Other community members and organisations Total
N 20 10 23 10 9 13 85
n % n % n % n % n % n % N %
Age
 26–40 12 60 2 20 10 43.5 1 10 4 44.4 6 46.2 35 41.2
 41–55 6 30 5 50 8 34.8 8 80 3 33.3 5 38.5 35 41.2
 56–70 2 10 3 30 5 21.7 1 10 2 22.2 2 15.4 15 17.6
Gender
 Male 7 35 7 70 13 56.5 9 90 8 88.9 7 53.8 51 60.0
 Female 13 65 3 30 10 43.5 1 10 1 11.1 6 46.2 34 40.0
Education
 None 1 5 2 20 0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 3 3.5
 Primary 11 55 5 50 0 0.0 0 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 16 18.8
 Secondary 4 20 1 10 1 4.3 0 0 4 44.4 3 23.1 13 15.3
 Tertiary 4 20 2 20 22 95.7 10 100 5 55.6 10 76.9 53 62.4
Location
 Dili 5 25 0 0 15 65.2 5 50 6 66.7 9 69.2 40 47.1
 Baucau 2 10 1 10 4 17.4 4 40 0 0.0 3 23.1 14 16.5
 Venilale 13 65 9 90 3 13.0 1 10 3 33.3 1 7.7 30 35.3
 Laclubar 0 0 0 0 1 4.3 0 0 0 0.0 0 0.0 1 1.2
  1. Notes: We adopt WHO’s definition of civil society as individuals and organisations working for “collective action around shared interests, purposes and values, generally distinct from government and commercial for-profit actors” [62]. Civil society includes community groups, social movements and advocacy groups. Civil society also includes local chiefs and customary healers who may not be mobilised in formal groups. Other community members and organisations include representatives from international development agencies, law enforcement, universities, and other people with relevant knowledge but who do not work specifically in mental health in Timor-Leste