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Table 3 Effect on health-related quality of life from becoming unemployed (n = 788)

From: Does unemployment contribute to poorer health-related quality of life among Swedish adults?

Health measure Risk differencea Confidence interval p Mean Squared Error
Quality-adjusted life years −0.096b [−0.158, −0.041] < 0.001 0.0379
EQ-5Dc - Usual activities 0.066d [0.004, 0.140] 0.036 0.0012
EQ-5Dc - Pain/discomfort 0.064d [− 0.085, 0.213] 0.395 0.0058
EQ-5Dc - Anxiety/depression 0.236d [0.087, 0.385] 0.002 0.0058
EQ-VASe −7.54b [−12.5, −2.99] < 0.001 5.840
Sensitivity analysis, scenario 1 (n = 780)f
 Quality-adjusted life years −0.084b [−0.145, − 0.029] 0.002 0.0289
 EQ-5D - Usual activities 0.053d [−0.009, 0.127] 0.107 0.0012
 EQ-5D - Pain/discomfort 0.058d [−0.091, 0.204] 0.449 0.0057
 EQ-5D - Anxiety/depression 0.232d [0.083, 0.378] 0.002 0.0057
Sensitivity analysis, scenario 2 (n = 741)g
 Quality-adjusted life years −0.028b [− 0.062, 0.006] 0.108 0.0035
 EQ-5D - Usual activities 0.013d [− 0.038, 0.076] 0.688 0.0009
 EQ-5D - Pain/discomfort 0.032d [− 0.134, 0.193] 0.696 0.0069
 EQ-5D - Anxiety/depression 0.211d [0.051, 0.375] 0.008 0.0067
  1. aPropensity scores were derived using gender, age, education level, marital status, and previous health for the participants
  2. bA risk difference above 0 means less problem with health-related quality of life for unemployed than employed
  3. cEuroQol 5 dimensions
  4. dA risk difference above 0 means more problem with health-related quality of life for unemployed than employed
  5. eEuroQol Visual Analogue Scale
  6. fExcluding those with major problems with movement, hygiene, or usual activities
  7. gExcluding those with major problems on any level