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Table 2 Associations of sedentary behavior and physical activity with social competence over three time-points

From: Physical activity and sedentary behavior across three time-points and associations with social skills in early childhood

  Express Comply Disruptb
b (95% CI) p-value b (95% CI) p-value b (95% CI) p-value
Accelerometer-derived
 Sedentary time (10 min/day)a − 0.083 (− 0.182, 0.017) 0.105 0.018 (− 0.080, 0.115) 0.722 0.004 (− 0.004, 0.011) 0.312
 LPA (10 min/day)a 0.129 (− 0.023, 0.282) 0.097 0.001 (− 0.150, 0.151) 0.992 − 0.005 (− 0.014, 0.005) 0.339
 MVPA (10 min/day)a 0.069 (− 0.201, 0.338) 0.619 0.013 (− 0.170, 0.196) 0.891 −0.002 (− 0.016, 0.017) 0.738
Parental-reported
 Screen time (10 min/day) −0.068 (− 0.114, − 0.023) 0.003 −0.056 (− 0.094, − 0.018) 0.002 0.004 (0.001, 0.006) 0.007
 Television/videos (10 min/day) − 0.069 (− 0.125, − 0.013) 0.016 −0.075 (− 0.134, − 0.016) 0.013 0.007 (0.004, 0.010) < 0.001
 Video/computer games (10 min/day) − 0.117 (− 0.222, − 0.012) c 0.030 −0.085 (− 0.159, − 0.011) 0.025 0.001 (− 0.005, 0.006)d 0.827
  1. PREPS Parents’ Role in Establishing healthy Physical activity and Sedentary behaviour habits. This project took place in Edmonton, Canada
  2. b (95% CI) Unstandardized beta coefficients and 95% confidence intervals; min/day minutes per day
  3. aStandardized for wear time
  4. bDisrupt values at time 2 and time 3 were log-transformed
  5. cAssociation was no longer significant (p = 0.09) when one influential observation was removed based on the Cook’s distance value
  6. dAssociation approached significance (p = 0.09) when eight observations were removed based on the Cook’s distance value
  7. p < 0.05