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Table 3 Participants’ self-reported knowledge and understanding of climate change (N = 66)

From: Environmental health practitioners potentially play a key role in helping communities adapt to climate change

Question and responses Number of participants
n (%)
Ever received training on climate change and health
 No 17 (25.7)
 Yes 48 (72.8)
Missing 1 (1.5)
Training on climate change and health from a
 Formal training only 9 (19.0%)
 Informal training only 13 (27.0%)
 Both formal and informal training 26 (54.0%)
Missing 0 (0.0)
‘Climate change is a serious threat to public health’, do you:
 Strongly agree 54 (82.0)
 Agree 10 (15.0)
 Disagree 0 (0.0)
 Strongly disagree 2 (3.0)
Missing 0 (0.0)
Have you noticed any climate change effects that occurred in your local communities?
 No 6 (9.0)
 Yes 56 (85.0)
 Don’t know 2 (3.0)
Missing 2 (3.0)
To what degree should EHPs be involved in helping communities adapt to climate change?
 Leading role 25 (37.8)
 Supportive role 41 (62.2)
 Minimal role 0 (0.0)
 No role 0 (0.0)
Missing 0 (0.0)
At what level do you think adaptation to climate change should be addressed?
 Global level 28 (42.0)
 National level 5 (8.0)
 Provincial level 1 (2.0)
 Local level 23 (35.0)
 More than one level 8 (12.0)
Missing 1 (1.0)
What societal group in your jurisdiction do you think is most vulnerable to health effects of climate change? (ranked by most reported) a
 Lower income / informal / poor communities 38 (25.3)
 Children 34 (22.6)
 Elderly people 34 (22.6)
 Immuno-compromised people 13 (8.6)
 Women 8 (5.3)
 People in rural areas 7 (4.6)
 Disabled people 5 (3.3)
 Black African people 4 (2.6)
 Farmers 3 (2.0)
 Homeless people 2 (1.3)
Missing 2 (1.3)
  1. aMultiple responses are allowed