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Table 5 Association between change in television viewing and BMI (weighted associations1)

From: Longitudinal associations between TV viewing and BMI not explained by the ‘mindless eating’ or ‘physical activity displacement’ hypotheses among adults

Daily TV viewing (hrs/day) BMI at CDAH2 (adjusted for BMI at CDAH1)
B (95% CI)
Model 1 (M1) Age, sex, education
Stable (ref)
> 1 h increase 0.38 (− 0.17, 0.93)
> 1 h decrease 0.01 (− 0.48, 0.49)
Model 2 (M2) M1 + Overall food & beverage consumption
Stable (ref)
> 1 h increase 0.37 (− 0.18, 0.91)
> 1 h decrease 0.02 (− 0.47, 0.50)
Model 3 (M3) M1 + LTPA
Stable (ref)
> 1 h increase 0.38 (− 0.17, 0.93)
> 1 h decrease 0.01 (− 0.47, 0.50)
Model 4 (M4) M1 + M2 + M3
Stable (ref)
> 1 h increase 0.36 (− 0.19, 0.91)
> 1 h decrease 0.02 (− 0.46, 0.51)
  1. 1Inverse probability weights were created from the comprehensive data collected over three time points. Observations that were missing were imputed using multiple imputation by chained equations so that a complete set of weights for the analysis sample was available; we imputed 50 different datasets, and for each a set of weights were derived and applied to the analysis model. The average of these model estimates was used to derive a set of weights for the analysis model
  2. CDAH1 Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study (2004–06); CDAH2 Childhood Determinants of Adult Health study (2009–10); TV television