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Table 1 Excluded studies of tuberculin skin test (TST) conversion rates or TB disease in HCWs and TB transmission control measures (n = 8)

From: Effectiveness of control measures to prevent occupational tuberculosis infection in health care workers: a systematic review

First author, year (country) Reason for exclusion Relevant finding
High-income countries
Fridkin, 1995 [19] (USA) Cross-hospital survey of TST conversion rates. Conversion rates lower in hospitals with transmission control measures.
Fella, 1995 [20] (USA) Overlap with Louther et al. [32] (Same hospital, similar period of study, 1991–1993) Decline in proportion of TST conversions over six 6-month cycles (20.7 to 5.8%) while CDC guidelines implemented.
Holton, 1997 [21] (Canada) Cross-hospital survey of TST conversion rates. Compliance with transmission control measures inadequate in both high and low TB risk facilities.
Boudreau 1997 [22] (USA) Longitudinal study of TST conversion rates but authors unable to attribute decline to transmission control measures. TST conversion rates fell over time in TB exposed health care workers.
Tokars, 2001 [23] (USA) Two-hospital study of TST conversion rates. Very low rates of TST conversion in both hospitals.
Low-and middle-income countries
Harries, 2002 [24] (Malawi) TB case notification rates before and after infection guidelines introduced. Small non-significant decline in TB case notification rates (3.7 to 3.2%).
Roth, 2005 [25] (Brazil) Cross-hospital survey of TST conversion rates. Conversion rates lower in hospitals with transmission control measures.
O’Hara, 2017 [26] (South Africa) Cross-sectional ecological study of TB incidence rates. TB incidence negatively associated with overall infection control score. Of specific components, only use of respirators remained protective after multivariable adjustment.
  1. CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention