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Table 3 Characteristics of the outcome and exposure variables in the eligible populationa

From: Subclinical atherosclerosis, cardiovascular health, and disease risk: is there a case for the Cardiovascular Health Index in the primary prevention population?

  All Subclinical Atherosclerosisb No Subclinical Atherosclerosisc Statistical
Significanced
Ankle Brachial Index (ABI) 3.4 (2.9–4.0) 96.6 (95.9–97.1)  
Framingham Risk Score
 Low risk (< 10%) 59.1 (57.8–60.4) 53.1 (0.45–61.4) 59.3 (58.0–60.6) §
 Intermediate risk (10%–20%) 32.1 (30.6–33.5) 27.5 (20.1–36.4) 32.2 (30.7–33.7)  
 High risk (> 20%) 8.9 (8.0–9.8) 19.4 (14.0–26.4) 8.5 (7.7–9.3)  
Metabolic Syndrome
 No 75.0 (73.9–76.6) 62.8 (54.5–70.4) 75.4 (73.7–77.0) §
 Yes (3 or more components) 25.0 (23.4–26.7) 37.2 (29.6–45.5) 24.6 (23.0–26.3)  
Cardiovascular Health Indexe
 Optimum overall health (12–14 points) 12.0 (10.3–13.9) 4.4 (1.5–12.5) 13.2 (11.5–15.2)  
 Average overall health (8–11 points) 75.7 (73.9–77.4) 79.8 (72.7–85.4) 75.2 (73.3–77.0)  
 Inadequate overall health (0–7 points) 12.3 (11.0–13.7) 15.8 (11.5–21.4) 11.6 (10.3–13.0) §
  1. aProportion estimates of the eligible population after applying sampling weights to the study sample (% (95% CI))
  2. bDefined as borderline ABI (0.91–0.99)
  3. cDefined as normal ABI (1.00–1.39)
  4. dPearson’s chi squared test for comparing differences in proportions between normal ABI and borderline ABI
  5. eCategorization criteria and scoring for the Cardiovascular Health Index is described in Table 1
  6. §Indicates statistical significance at the p < 0.05 level