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Table 5 Perceived outcomes of knowledge brokering

From: Can knowledge exchange support the implementation of a health-promoting schools approach? Perceived outcomes of knowledge exchange in the COMPASS study

  Number of Participants
  School (n = 13) Public Health (n = 4) COMPASS Team
(n = 8)
Co-Investigators
(n = 5)
Total Participants
(n = 30)
i) Outcomes for Knowledge Users
Added value of knowledge brokering over SHP 3 1 7 3 14
 Motivation, support for next steps 1 1 4 3 9
 Access to additional data, further analyses, comparison data 1 1 5   7
 Clarification of findings 2 1    3
 Ideas for programming 3     3
 Find out about opportunities 3     3
Relationship building 2 3 5 0 10
 School-public health unit 1 1 4   6
 School-researcher 0 0 3 0 3
School-level changes 1 0 7 0 8
 Schools winning healthy school grants, awards 1   7   8
 Changes to school facilities, new programs implemented    2   2
Increased awareness and priority of school health issues 0 0 5 0 5
Unsure if KB led to change at student-level    3   3
Unsure of long-term impacts    3   3
ii) Outcomes for COMPASS Team & Study 8 8
Feedback led to changes within study, will lead to future changes    5   5
Keeping schools engaged & returning year-to-year    4   4
Active involvement of graduate students in research project    4   4
Understanding implementation and context of interventions    3   3
Will incorporate knowledge brokering into future research    3   3
iii) Outcomes for Knowledge Brokers 7 7
Greater understanding of realities of school environment    3   3
Influenced future career prospects    3   3
Thinking about knowledge translation in own research    3   3
  1. - Not relevant to participant group