Skip to main content

Table 5 Characteristics of nutrition intervention studies

From: Type and extent of trans-disciplinary co-operation to improve food security, health and household environment in low and middle income countries: systematic review

Study (Author and publication year) Country Participants (sample size, age, setting) Study design Intervention details (I = Intervention and C = Control) Duration of intervention (months) Outcome measured
Ali D et al. 2013 Bangladesh, Vietnam, Ethiopia 2356 (Ethiopia), 3075 (Vietnam), 3422 (Bangladesh) households, participants aged 6 monthsnths-5 years CSS I: Nutrition education NR Food consumption and anthropometry
Chow J, et al. 2010 India participants aged 1–4 years, household Intervention study I: High dose vitamin A supplementation, Industrial fortification of mustard oil and GM fortification of mustard oil and seed NR Health
Creed-Kanashiro H et al. 2003 Peru 42 participants, aged 12–51 years, community Interventional study (pre and post) I: Nutrition education NR Nutrient deficiencies, education
Darapheak C, et al. 2013 Cambodia 6202 participants, aged 12–59 months, household CSS (post intervention only) I: Animal source food group
C: Non animal source food group
NR Anthropometry, health
English RM, et al. 1997 Vietnam 720 children <6 years, community CSS (2 groups) I: Home gardening and nutrition education (n = 469)
C: Usual practice (n = 251)
24-36 Nutrient intake, health
Faber M, et al. 2002 South Africa 208 participants, aged 2–5 years, community CSS (Pre and post) I: Home gardening along with nutrition education (n = 108)
C: Usual practice (n = 100)
20 Nutrient intake
Fenn B et al. 2012 Ethiopia 5552 participants, 6–36 monthsnths, household CSS (pre and post) I: Multiple intervention; health care, nutrition education, water and sanitation (4124)
C: Protective safety net programme (1428)
30 Anthropometry
Gibson RS et al. 2003 Malawi 281 participants, aged between 30–40 months, household Quasi- experimental I: Complementary foods (n = 200)
C: Usual practice (n = 81)
6 Food consumption, nutrient intake, anthropometry
Grillenberger, et al. 2006 Kenya 498 participants, mean age 7.4 years RCT I: Three supplementary foods groups: meat (n = 134), milk (n = 144) and energy (veg oil) supplied as a school snack in a maize stew (n = 148)
C: Usual practice (n = 129)
24 Anthropometry
Grillenberger, et al. 2006 Kenya 554 participants, mean age 7.4 years RCT I: Three supplementary foods groups: meat (n = 134), milk (n = 144) and energy (veg oil) supplied as a school snack in a maize stew (n = 148)
C: Usual practice (n = 129)
24 Nutrient intake, anthropometry
Imran M, et al. 2014 India 245 participants, aged 2–4 years, community Intervention study I: Nutrition education along with supplementary nutrition and supervision 12 Anthropometry
Kabahenda M, et al. 2011 Uganda 89 children <4 years, household RCT I: Nutrition education (n = 46)
C: Sewing classes (n = 43)
12 Food consumption, nutrient deficiencies
Khan A Z et al. 2013 Pakistan 586 participants, aged 6 mo- 8 years, household Intervention study (pre and post) I: Nutrition education 3 Food consumption, anthropometry
Kilaru A, et al. 2005 India 242 infants aged 5–11 months, household Intervention study I: Nutrition education (n = 173)
C: No nutrition education (n = 69)
36 Food consumption, Anthropometry
Lanerolle P and Atukorala S, 2006 Sir Lanka 229 adolescent girls aged between 15–19 years, household Intervention study (pre and post) I: Nutrition education 10 weeks Nutrition knowledge, food consumption, nutrient deficiencies
Lartey A et al. 1999 Ghana 216 participants, aged 6–12 months, households RCT I: One of following complementary fortified foods: Weanimix (W) a combination of soybeans, maize and groundnuts, Weanimix plus minerals and vitamins (WM), Weanimix plus fish powder (WF) and Koko plus fish powder (KF) (n = 208)
C: Usual practice (n = 465)
6 Anthropometry
Moore JB, et al. 2009 Nicaragua 182 adolescents and 67 mothers, community Longitudinal study (pre and post) I: Nutrition education 48 for girls and 24 for mothers Nutritional knowledge, nutrient deficiencies
Pawloski LR and Moore JB; 2007 Nicaragua 186 adolescent girls aged 10–17 years, community Intervention study (pre and post) I: Nutrition education 36 Nutritional knowledge, Anthropometry, nutrient deficiencies
Phawa S, et al. 2010 India 370 mothers of children aged 12–71 months, community Intervention study (2 groups) I: Nutrition and health education (n = 195)
C: Usual practice (n = 175)
9 Health
Pant CR, et al. 1996 Nepal 40,000 children aged 6–12 months Intervention study (pre and post) I: Mega dose vitamin A capsules and nutrition education
C: Usual practice
24 Health, nutrient deficiencies
Rivera JA, et al. 2004 Mexico 650 children aged <12 months, household Randomised crossover study I: Nutrition Education along with micronutrient- fortified foods (n = 373)
C: Cross over intervention group (n = 277)
24 Anthropometry, nutrient deficiencies
Roy SK, et al. 2005 Bangladesh 282 children aged 6–24 months, household RCT I1: Intensive nutrition education twice a week
I2: Intensive nutrition education and supplementary food
C: Nutrition education from community nutrition promotors
3 Food consumption Anthropometry, Nutrient intake, Education
Salehi M, et al. 2004 Iran 811 children aged <5 years, household Intervention study (2 groups) I: Nutrition education (n = 406)
C: Usual practice (n = 405)
12 Anthropometry, Food consumption
Santos I, et al. 2001 Brazil 424 participants, aged <18 months, community RCT I: Nutritional counselling (n = 218)
C: Usual practice (n = 206)
One off training Anthropometry
Sazawal S, et al. 2010 India 633 participants, 1–4 years, community RCT I: Micronutrient fortified milk (n = 316)
C: Non-fortified milk (n = 317)
12 Anthropometry and nutrient deficiencies
Sekartini R et al. 2013 Indonesia 54 participants, aged between 5–6 years, household RCT I: Four different complementary milks products; Std GUM, Iso-5 GUM, Iso-5 LP GUM, Iso-2 · 5 GUM 2 Health
Siekmann JF et al. 2003 Kenya 555 participants aged between 5–14 years RCT I: Three supplementary foods groups: meat (n = 134), milk (n = 144) and energy (veg oil) supplied as a school snack in a maize stew (n = 148)
C: Usual practice (n = 129)
12 Food consumption, nutrient intake
Serkatini R et al. 2013 Indonesia 54 participants, aged 5–6 years, household Cross over study I: Four different growing up milk (GUM) products – Standard GUM, Std GUM with 5 g isomaltulose per serving (Iso-5 GUM0, Iso-5 GU with lowered protein content (Iso-5 LP GUM), Std GUM with 2.5 g isomaltulose in combination with other vitamins and minerals (Iso 2.5 GUM) 2 Health
Vitolo M R et al. 2008 Brazil 500 individuals, all age, household RCT I: Breastfeeding and weaning counselling and complementary foods (163 mothers baby pairs) C: No dietary advice given (234 mother-baby pairs) 6 Health
Walsh CM, et al. 2002 South Africa 815 children aged 2 to 5 years, household Intervention study (2 groups) I: Nutrition education plus food aid
C: Food aid only
24 Anthropometry, nutrient deficiencies
  1. RCT randomised control trial, CSS cross sectional study, NR: Not reported