Skip to main content

Table 4 Logistic regression models estimating the associations (OR and 95 % CI) between mental health and dropout specifically for each educational level in the full sample and stratified by gender

From: Mental health and school dropout across educational levels and genders: a 4.8-year follow-up study

  Full samplea Femalesb Malesb
n = 1524 n = 829 n = 695
Mental health
 Poor mental health / Vocational education 1.8 (1.0–3.2) 1.8 (0.8–4.4) 1.6 (0.7–3.7)
 Poor mental health / General secondary 1.1 (0.3–3.6) 1.7 (0.4–7.7) 0.7 (0.1–6.0)
 Poor mental health / Higher education 2.0 (1.0–4.2) 1.2 (0.5–3.1) 5.2 (1.6–17.3)
 Good mental health / Same educational level 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference
Educational level
 Vocational education 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference
 General secondary 0.2 (0.1–0.3) 0.1 (0.0–0.3) 0.2 (0.1–0.5)
 Higher education 1.0 (0.6–2.0) 1.5 (0.6–3.4) 0.6 (0.2–1.7)
Age
 16–20 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference
 21–25 0.6 (0.3–1.0) 0.5 (0.2–1.1) 0.6 (0.3–1.2)
 26–30 0.5 (0.3–1.1) 0.4 (0.1–1.1) 0.8 (0.3–2.1)
Parental education
 Elementary school 1.3 (0.7–2.7) 1.2 (0.5–3.4) 1.7 (0.6–4.2)
 Upper secondary 0.9 (0.6–1.4) 0.9 (0.5–1.8) 0.9 (0.5–1.6)
 Higher Education 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference
Parental income
 Low 2.9 (1.7–4.7) 3.8 (1.7–8.3) 2.4 (1.2–4.8)
 Middle 1.5 (0.9–2.5) 2.2 (1.0–5.0) 1.0 (0.5–2.0)
 High 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference 1.0 Reference
Gender
 Females 0.8 (0.5–1.2)     
 Males 1.0 Reference     
  1. The mental health variables represent estimated relative dropout risks associated with poor mental health relative to good mental at the given educational level
  2. aAdjusted for educational level, gender, age, parental education, parental income and ethnicity (estimates not shown)
  3. bAdjusted for educational level, age, parental education, parental income and ethnicity (estimates not shown)