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Table 2 Overview of ‘Market Justice’ and ‘Social Justice’ Framing of Tobacco, Processed Food and Soft Drinks, and Alcohol issues adapted from: [18, 34, 37, 82]

From: Why media representations of corporations matter for public health policy: a scoping review

  Tobacco Processed food and soft drinks Alcohol Common
Market Justice • Tobacco consumption is a choice; p eople chose to smoke.
• People have a right to smoke.
• Parents are responsible for ensuring that their children don’t smoke.
• Tobacco companies provide a product which people chose to consume.
• Tobacco companies have a right to promote a legal product.
• Sufficient legislation is in place to prevent children and adolescents from accessing tobacco; additional legislation is unnecessary.
• Tobacco companies, particularly those that produce products with less harm than traditional cigarettes, are legitimate partners in tobacco control policy and harm reduction strategies.
• People should be able to choose what they eat freely.
• Parents are responsible for ensuring that their children eat healthy diets.
• What the food industry produces reflects what people want.
• Processed food and soft drinks companies are legitimate and crucial partners in the development and implementation of obesity and nutrition policies.
• Individuals are responsible for drinking alcohol safely and responsibly.
• Parents are responsible for ensuring that their children don’t drink alcohol.
• The alcohol industry is not responsible for the irresponsible or dangerous behaviour of ‘problem drinkers’ (e.g. binge drinkers).
• Sufficient legislation is in place to prevent children and adolescents from accessing alcohol; additional legislation is inappropriate.
• Alcohol companies are legitimate and crucial partners in the development and implementation of alcohol policies.
• Individuals are responsible for their own well-being.
• The best solutions to public health problems are individual level approaches.
• Tobacco, alcohol and food and drinks consumption are lifestyle issues.
• Resources should be allocated based on ability to pay, not need.
• Market forces are a suitable means to determine that the right products are available to the appropriate customers.
• Industry can help people make informed personal choices by providing information.
• Voluntary codes and self-regulation are more efficient, effective and appropriate than government regulation.
• ‘Nanny state governments’, that regulate what individuals can and cannot consume, deprive people of their freedom and liberty and coddle people, preventing them from the dignity of fending for themselves.
Social Justice • People have a right to breathe air uncontaminated by second hand smoke.
• Communities have a right to say no to targeted marketing of tobacco.
• Vulnerable populations, e.g. children and adolescents, have to be protected from marketing of tobacco, whose aim is to initiate and maintain addiction.
• Regulation of the industry is crucial to curtailing the epidemic.
• The tobacco industry has a responsibility to pay the costs of tobacco-related illnesses.
• Tobacco policy has to be protected from the vested interests of tobacco companies.
• All people and communities have a right to have access to healthy and affordable food.
• Food companies should not promote unhealthy products, particularly not to children.
• Vulnerable populations, e.g. children and adolescents, have to be protected from targeted marketing of unhealthy food and drinks.
• Regulation of the industry is necessary to curtail obesity.
• Due to their commercial interests, processed food and soft drink industries should not be able to influence obesity and nutrition policies.
• Communities and governments have a duty to protect citizens from risky alcohol use.
• Alcohol companies should not promote their products to children, adolescents, or problem drinkers.
• Vulnerable populations, e.g. children and adolescents, have to be protected from alcohol marketing, which aims to encourage unhealthy alcohol consumption and initiate and maintain addiction.
• Regulation of the industry is necessary to curtail harmful consumption of alcohol.
• Due to their commercial interests, alcohol companies should not be able to influence alcohol policy.
• Members of society have a shared responsibility to look after each other.
• Vulnerable populations have to be protected from exploitation by more powerful societal actors.
• Public policy should make healthy behaviour the easier and more accessible choice.
• When markets fail to protect public health, communities and governments have a right and responsibility to act, e.g. by regulating industries and preventing corporations from influencing public health policies.