Skip to main content

Table 2 Rural and urban differences in tobacco and khat use, secondhand smoke exposure, and exposure to point-of-sale advertising (N = 353)

From: Factors associated with secondhand tobacco smoke in the home: an exploratory cross-sectional study among women in Aleta Wondo, Ethiopia

  Total Rural Urban p
n % (n = 179) (n = 174)
Cigarette use
 Never smoker 350 (99.2) 177 (98.9) 173 (99.4) ns
 Ever tried but not smoking now 3 (0.8) 2 (1.1) 1 (0.6) ns
Smokeless tobacco product use
 Ever tried but not currently using (chewing tobacco) 2 (0.3) 1 (0.6) 1 (0.6) ns
Khat use
 Ever chewed 39 (11.0) 4 (2.2) 35 (20.1) <.001
 Chewed in last 30 days (% yes) 12 (3.4) 1 (0.6) 11 (6.3) ns
Secondhand smoke exposure in home
 Live with one or more tobacco usersa 27 (7.6) 9 (5.0) 18 (10.3) .060
 Smoking of tobacco products permitted indoorsb 51 (14.6) 13 (7.3) 38 (21.9) <.001
 Smoking occurs daily inside housec 50 (14.4) 11 (6.1) 39 (23.1) <.001
 Young children (≤5 years) frequently/always exposed to tobacco smoke indoorsd 11 (5.1) 6 (5.2) 5 (5.0) ns
Member of household currently involved in growing, manufacturing, or selling tobacco products (% yes) 21 (5.9) 10 (5.6) 11 (6.3) ns
Exposure to point-of-sale advertising, in last 30 days (% yes) 191 54.1 73 40.8 89 51.1 .055
  1. aParticipants were asked, “How many people living in your household use tobacco products?”
  2. bParticipants were asked, “I want to ask you about smoking inside you house. Please answer from the following options. Inside your house smoking is 1) allowed, 2) not allowed, but there are exceptions, 3) never allowed.” (Response 1 or 2 = permitted)
  3. cParticipants were asked, “How often does someone smoke inside your house? (daily, weekly, monthly, less than monthly, or never)”
  4. dResults include only respondents with children 5 years or younger (n = 215; Rural = 116, Urban = 99)