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Table 3 Effects of intervention on knowledge, attitudes, and behaviours towards salt

From: Effects of a community-based salt reduction program in a regional Australian population

  Baseline Follow-up Adjusted prevalence ratio (95 % CI)  
2011 (n=419) Unadjusted prevalence, % 2014 (n=572) Unadjusted prevalence, %   P-value
Do you add salt to your food at the table?
Always 21.2 19.4 0.98 (0.75–1.28) 0.88
Do you add salt to food when cooking?
Always 19.1 20.1 1.14 (0.88–1.48) 0.32
How much salt do you think you consume?
Too much 27.9 30.1 1.10 (0.89–1.35) 0.37
Maximum salt consumption recommendation?
Correctly identified as <6 g 18.2 28.7 1.53 (1.19–1.96) 0.001
High salt cause serious health problems?
Yes 95.0 95.3 1.0 (0.97–1.02) 0.76
How important is lowering salt in your diet?
Important 63.7 78.2 1.23 (1.13–1.34) <0.001
Do you do anything to regularly control your salt intake?
Yes 63.3 60.1 0.94 (0.85–1.04) 0.22
Do you avoid processed foods?
Yes 44.2 35.3 0.80 (0.68–0.94) 0.006
Do you check food labels?
Yes 30.0 24.5 0.77 (0.62–0.95) 0.02
Do you buy low salt alternatives?
Yes 33.9 32.0 0.94 (0.78–1.13) 0.48
Do you use spices?
Yes 4.8 28.3 5.83 (3.70–9.20) <0.001
Do you avoid eating out
Yes 20.8 34.4 1.58 (1.26–1.99) <0.001
  1. Data shows unadjusted prevalence percentage and adjusted prevalence ratio (95 % confidence intervals) as calculated using a modified Poisson regression for unmatched data and a generalized estimating equation for the matched data