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Table 1 General characteristics and the prevalence of supplement use of 10–11 year-old students in Alberta, Canada

From: The prevalence and determinants of use of vitamin D supplements among children in Alberta, Canada: a cross-sectional study

  All students, %a (n = 2686) Vitamin D supplement users (with or without multivitamin use), % (n = 769)a Multivitamin supplement users (with or without vitamin D supplement use), % (n = 1468)
Gender
 Girls 53.49 51.81 54.57
 Boys 46.51 48.19 45.43
Parental educationb
 Secondary or less 23.19 19.68 21.07
 College 33.54 35.87 34.28
 University/graduate 37.89 38.90 39.99
Household income
 ≤$50,000 13.21 12.82 11.55
 $50,001 – $100,000 19.03 19.64 20.09
 ≥$100,001 28.89 30.07 30.81
 Non-disclosed/Missingc 38.87 37.48 37.55
Region of residence
 Rural 39.55 35.87 40.19
 Urban 8.28 8.14 8.65
 Metropolitan 52.17 55.99 51.16
Weight statusb
 Under/normal weight 68.59 71.30 70.55
 Overweight 20.84 18.38 19.61
 Obese 7.86 7.58 6.76
Physical activity level
 1st Tertile 33.32 27.85 30.94
 2nd Tertile 33.32 34.11 32.97
 3rd Tertile 33.36 38.04 36.09
Energy-adjusted diet quality indexd
 1st Tertile 33.32 30.76 31.09
 2nd Tertile 33.32 34.43 34.37
 3rd Tertile 33.36 34.81 34.54
Energy-adjusted total dietary vitamin Dd
 1st Tertile 33.32 33.73 32.77
 2nd Tertile 33.32 31.76 31.64
 3rd Tertile 33.36 34.51 35.59
  1. aResults were weighted to represent provincial estimates of the grade five student population (age: 10–11y) in Alberta
  2. b<5 % of missing data
  3. c26.63 % non-disclosed responses (participants were provided option not to disclose their household income) and 12.23 % missing data
  4. d“Energy adjusted” DQI and dietary vitamin D intake were computed as the residuals from the regression model with total energy intake as the independent variable and absolute DQI or dietary vitamin D intake as the dependent variable as per established criteria [26]