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Table 1 Description of the use of three conceptual life course models among those inside the workforce having a manual or non-manual socioeconomic position (SEP) at three periods in life (ages 10–15, 30–35 and 40–45). A total population investigation from Scania, Sweden.

From: Similar support for three different life course socioeconomic models on predicting premature cardiovascular mortality and all-cause mortality

Critical period* Intergenerational (A,B,C)‡ Intragenerational (B,C)§
(A) 10–15 years (B) 30–35 years (C) 40–45 years Social mobility† Cumulative risk¶ Social mobility†
1 1 1 Stable down 3 Stable down
1 1 0 Upwards (C) 2 Upwards (C)
1 0 0 Upwards (B,C) 1 Stable up
0 1 1 Downwards (B,C) 2  
0 0 1 Downwards (C) 1 Downwards (C)
0 0 0 Stable up 0  
  1. * Critical period model focuses on the importance of an independent effect of exposure to manual SEP during a specific sensitive period in life, having lasting effects on adult health. Non-manual workers = 0 and manual workers = 1.
  2. † The social mobility model focuses on the importance of change in SEP to adult health.
  3. ‡ Intergenerational social mobility was defined as having a different socioeconomic position (SEP) in childhood than in adulthood. Intergenerational social mobility was defined as upward, downward or socially stable comparing the childhood SEP with the subject's own occupation at age 30–35 and at age 40–45.
  4. § Intragenerational social mobility was defined as having a different SEP at age 30–35 and at age 40–45. Intragenerational social mobility was defined as upward, downward or socially stable comparing the subject's own occupation at age 30–35 with the occupation at age 40–45.
  5. ¶ The cumulative risk model focuses on accumulation of risk during the life course. The cumulative score ranged from 0 to 3 since it was calculated by summing SEP values (i.e., non-manual employees were given 0 points and manual workers were given 1 point) at ages 10–15, 30–35 and 40–45.