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Table 2 Characteristics of parent–child dyads and factors associated with non-response of parent

From: Agreement between parent and child report on parental practices regarding dietary, physical activity and sedentary behaviours: the ENERGY cross-sectional survey

   Participants Non-responders*  
   N % N % OR 95% CI
Child - parent dyads 6′425   1′452      
Child          
Gender Girls 3′423 53 675 47 1.00    
  Boys 3′002 47 777 54 0.73 0.63 - 0.84
Age (years) 10 < 11 1,418 22 226 16 1.00    
  11 < 12 2,859 45 530 37 0.96 0.78 - 1.18
  12 < 13 1,933 30 523 36 0.69 0.55 - 0.85
  13 < 14 205 3 81 6 0.40 0.27 - 0.58
National lan-guage at home No 422 7 182 13 1.00    
Yes 5′951 93 1′199 83 2.45 1.92 - 3.12
Living with Both parents 5′335 83 1′132 78 1.00    
  Mother or father 581 9 186 13 0.65 0.52 - 0.82
  Other adults 466 7 65 5 0.90 0.66 - 1.22
Siblings No 988 15 176 12 1.00    
  Yes 5′384 84 1′203 83 0.87 0.71 - 1.07
Weight status Normal 4′354 68 955 66 n.a.    
  Overweight 1′470 23 295 20     
  Underweight§ 506 8 108 7     
   Mean SD Mean SD     
BMI of child kg/m2 19.01 3.29 18.99 3.38 0.97 0.95 - 0.99
Parent   N %       
Gender Mother 5′297 82       
Father 1′107 17       
Education < 14 years 2′800 44       
  ≥ 14 years 3′560 55       
   Mean SD       
Age of parent years 41.34 5.20       
BMI of parent kg/m2 24.50 4.25       
  1. Abbreviations: BMI Body mass index, CI Confidence Interval, OR Odds ratio.
  2. *Parents who did not return a questionnaire.
  3. Multilevel (country, school) logistic regression analyses with response as outcome variable including all child characteristics listed (including BMI as a continuous variable).
  4. Using IOTF standard definition [41].
  5. §Using cut-off value as defined by Cole et al., BMJ, 2007 [40].
  6. Percentages do not always add up to 100% due to missing values and rounding.