Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 2 Results and sensitivity analyses: cost savings of reduced constipation rates attributed to increased dietary fiber intakes

From: Cost savings of reduced constipation rates attributed to increased dietary fiber intakes: a decision-analytic model

Annual cost reduction Key parameters and/or change(s) in key parameters
$12.7 billion Base case
$1.1 billion No change in fiber intake for 75% of adults; 25% of adults increase fiber intake by 3 g daily
$13.2 billion Assumes that 1% of men and women currently meet fiber intake recommendation
$12.0 billion Assumes that 10% of men and women currently meet fiber intake recommendation
$7.5 billion Assumes that 50% of adults with constipation respond to fiber increase
$4.8 billion Assumes that 25% of adults with constipation require a prescription; 75% take over-the counter products
$20.0 billion Assumes that 1 g of increased fiber intake is associated with a 3% reduction in constipation
$19.3 billion Assumes that 7% of the adult population has constipation
$2.8 billion Assumes that 1% of the adult population has constipation
$19.5 billion Assumes that 4.0% of men and 10.2% of women have constipation {Markland, 2013 #632}
$21.9 billion Assumes that adults increase fiber intake by 15 g daily
$0.7 billion Pediatric population only; assumes 100% of the population increased fiber intake by 6 g daily
$83.9 billion Multivariate: best case - Assumes that 1% of adults meet fiber intake recommendations, 7% of adults have constipation, 1 g of fiber intake is associated with a 3% reduction in constipation, all patients require a prescription medication, 100% of adults increase fiber intake (by 15 g daily)
$2.3 million Multivariate: worst case - Assumes that 10% of adults meet fiber intake recommendations, 1% of adults have constipation, 1 g of fiber intake is associated with a 1% reduction in constipation, all patients are treated with an over the counter medication, only 25% of adults increase fiber intake (by 3 g daily)