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Table 2 The associations of factors of family context with excessive spending of time watching TV among adolescents

From: How parents can affect excessive spending of time on screen-based activities

    Watching TV 2 hours and more
    Model 1 Model 2 Model 3
   N (%) OR (95% CI)   OR (95% CI)
Gender Boys 293 (66.1)    1.18 (0.87-1.61)
Girls 250 (62.0)    1
Age (grade) 15-years old (9th grade) 324 (73.3)    1.80 (1.30-2.51)***
11-years old (5th grade) 219 (53.9)    1
Family completeness Incomplete 51 (72.9) 1.46 (0.83-2.57)   
Mixed 67 (67.7) 1.15 (0.72-1.83)   
Intact 411 (62.8) 1   
TV located in bedroom Yes 305 (70.1) 1.64 (1.23-2.20)**   1.59 (1.17-2.16)**
No 233 (57.8) 1   1
Parents apply rules about time spent watching TV Rarely-never 370 (71.7) 1.84 (1.33-2.56)***   1.76 (1.26-2.46)**
Every day-almost every day 153 (53.1) 1 a 1
Parents apply rules about content of TV programmes Rarely-never 389 (69.2) 1.40 (0.99-1.97)   
Every day-almost every day 132 (54.8) 1 b  
Watching TV together with parents Every day 157 (74.8) 1.95 (1.36-2.79)***   1.84 (1.25-2.70)**
Most days 381 (60.8) 1   1
Activities shared with parents Lower score = more frequently shared activities   0.99 (0.85-1.17) c  
  1. athe interaction effect of parental rules about time spent watching TV and age on chance of excessive TV watching was not significant.
  2. bthe interaction effect of parental rules about the content of TV programmes and age on chance of excessive TV watching was not significant.
  3. cthe interaction effect of activities shared with parents and age on chance of excessive TV watching was not significant.
  4. Model 1 Each variable separated and adjusted to age and gender.
  5. Model 2 Model 1 enriched by interaction.
  6. Model 3 All variables included in one step.
  7. **p < 0.05 **p < 0.01 ***p < 0.001.