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Table 2 Smoking status prevalence by selected independent variables at baseline, after passage of the 1 st and 2 nd smoke-free laws

From: Impact of a long-term tobacco-free policy at a comprehensive cancer center: a series of cross-sectional surveys

  Baseline 2001-2002-2004 After 1stlaw 2006-2009 After 2ndlaw 2012 p for trend
(n = 580) (n = 462) (n = 221)
  % PR (Ref) % PR (95% CI)a % PR (95% CI)a
Never-smokers 42.9 1 41.6 0.99 (0.82 - 1.20) 49.7 1.28 (1.01 - 1.62) 0.118
Former smokers 24.7 1 27.9 1.18 (0.99 - 1.46) 28.1 0.69 (0.82 - 1.50) 0.232
Current smokers b 33.1 1 30.5 0.91 (0.73 - 1.13) 22.2 0.65 (0.47 - 0.89) 0.005
Smoking prevalence by selected variables       
Sex        
Men 27.3 1 22.5 0.77 (0.46 - 1.30) 19.2 0.59 (0.28 - 1.22) 0.200
Women 35.1 1 33.0 0.94 (0.74 - 1.21) 23.1 0.65 (0.46 - 0.94) 0.009
Age group (years)        
< 35 34.2 1 39.2 1.18 (0.87 - 1.58) 35.3 1.01 (0.64 - 1.59) 0.507
≥ 35 31.9 1 23.3 0.65 (0.47 - 0.91) 16.3 0.42 (0.27 - 0.67) 0.000
Professional group        
Doctors 22.1 1 17.3 0.72 (0.37 - 1.41) 15.0 0.20 (0.05 - 0.87) 0.018
Nurses 31.5 1 31.7 1.08 (0.77 - 1.52) 24.7 0.82 (0.49-1.38) 0.357
Administrative staff 41.3 1 27.3 0.61 (0.34 - 1.08) 33.3 0.78 (0.42 - 1.46) 0.222
Others 39.5 1 38.8 0.95 (0.66 - 1.47) 22.4 0.54 (0.29 - 1.01) 0.050
  1. aAdjusted for sex, age, and profession when necessary.
  2. bIncludes daily and occasionally smokers.
  3. PR: prevalence ratio obtained from a log-binomial regression model adjusted for sex, age group, and profession group when necessary.