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Table 2 Chlamydia management and control activities in study countries

From: Provision of chlamydia testing, and training of primary health care staff about chlamydia testing, across four European countries

  England Estonia France Sweden
Written guidelines or recommendations about chlamydia diagnosis and case management UK National Guideline for the Management of Genital Tract Infection with Chlamydia trachomatis (2006) Estonian Union against Sexually Transmitted Infections (EUSTI), 2011 2010: Health authority recommendations on laboratory diagnostic procedure only The Board of County Medical Officers 2010
  British Association for Sexual Health and HIV (BASHH), 2006    
  National Chlamydia Screening Programme Core Guidance 6th Edition 2012    
Guidelines recommend testing for asymptomatic people Yes Yes Yes Yes
    Since 2003: recommendations for screening at- risk women aged 15–25 [32]  
Repeat test recommended for patients with a positive chlamydia test Repeat test of positives 3 months after diagnosis Repeat test of positives 3 months after diagnosis No Test for cure
Additional testing for other STIs or HIV recommended for those with positive chlamydia test Yes Yes Yes Yes
  Including HIV Including HIV   
Partner notification recommended Yes (patient and provider referral) Yes (patient referral) Yes (patient referral) Yes (patient and provider referral)
Written guidelines or recommendations about chlamydia diagnosis and case management specifically for GPs Yes, contained within National Chlamydia Screening Programme Core Guidance 6th Edition 2012 and BASHH 2006 No No Yes, Recommendations from the Board of County Medical officers, 2010
  Royal College of General Practitioners 2013 Sexually Transmitted Infections in primary care guidelines    
National chlamydia screening program Yes No No No
National surveillance data for chlamydia routinely reported Yes Yes No (Not routinely, but intermittently) Yes
Chlamydia cases reported by Laboratories Settings in which they are diagnosed (= physicians) Surveillance network of volunteer (not compulsory, not reimbursed) laboratories that report detection rates of chlamydia (ReNaChla) Settings in which they are diagnosed (= physicians)
Settings providing chlamydia testing (GUM = genitourinary medicine clinic; STI = sexually transmitted infections clinics; GYN = gynecology clinics) GUM, sexual and reproductive health services, GPs, pharmacies, termination of pregnancy providers, internet based services, other (including targeted youth services) Youth Health Centres; GYN; STI; internet based self-sampling; GP; STI, GYN; Family planning clinic; Internal medicine specialist GP; STI, GYN; ER; internet based self-sampling; Family planning clinic; Youth Health Centres
Main site for chlamydia testing Men/women - GUM, primary care settings including GP Women - GYN; Youth - free and Women: Family planning
   Men – STI clinic anonymous family or GP Men: STI clinic or GP
   Youth – Youth health centres planning clinics Youth - Youth surgeries
Breakdown of chlamydia cases by setting for diagnosis or treatment (top 3) STI/GUM 29% STI 20% Presumed to originate STI 25%
  GP 18% GP 6% mainly from Youth Health GP 10%
  Family planning 15% Youth Health Centres 30% Centres and STI, Family Youth Health Centres 40%
  Other 33% GYN 30% planning clinics