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Table 3 Separate and joint effects of education and occupation on central obesity – Four Provinces Study, China (2008/09)

From: Education is associated with lower levels of abdominal obesity in women with a non-agricultural occupation: an interaction study using China’s four provinces survey

Complete cases (N = 1921) Unadjusted Age group and parityadjusted Age group, parity and health behaviour2adjusted Age group, parity, health behaviour and area of residence adjusted
  OR (95%CI) P-value3 OR (95%CI) P-value3 OR (95%CI) P-value3 OR (95%CI) Pcpvalue3
Separate effects 1
Education level
None 1   1   1   1  
Any 1.24 (1.02,1.50) 0.03 1.27 (1.05, 1.55) 0.02 1.19 (0.97, 1.45) 0.09 0.96 (0.78, 1.20) 0.7
Occupational status  
Agricultural 1   1   1   1  
Non-agricultural 1.61 (1.33, 1.95) <0.001 1.59 (1.30, 1.94) <0.001 1.46 (1.19, 1.81) <0.001 1.11 (0.84, 1.45) 0.4
Joint effects (Odds of obesity for occupational status [Non-agricultural vs. agricultural] within education levels) 3
Education level
None 2.28 (1.57, 3.31) <0.001 2.21 (1.52, 3.21) <0.001 2.10 (1.43, 3.07) <0.001 1.66 (1.11, 2.49) 0.01
Any 1.33 (0.99, 1.78) 0.06 1.25 (0.92, 1.70) 0.1 1.15 (0.84, 1.57) 0.4 0.84 (0.58, 1.20) 0.3
P for interaction4 0.02   0.02   0.02   <0.01  
  1. 1 Odds ratios of obesity for education level [Any vs. None] and occupational status [Non-agricultural vs. agricultural].
  2. 2 Health behaviours included current alcohol consumption, smoking status, meat consumption and fruit and vegetable consumption.
  3. 3 P-value for the Wald test.
  4. 4 P-value for the LR test comparing the models with and without the interaction term between education and occupation.