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Table 3 Associations between injury and depression in 35,155 workers according to factors of adjustment

From: Depression as a psychosocial consequence of occupational injury in the US working population: findings from the medical expenditure panel survey

Factors of adjustment Non-occupational injury % excess risk explained Occupational injury % excess risk explained
  Odds ratio 95% CI   Odds ratio 95% CI  
1 Base a 1.43 1.19–1.80   1.91 1.43–2.56  
2 Socioeconomic status b 1.37 1.10–1.73 14.0 1.78 1.34–2.37 14.3
3 Work-related c 1.40 1.11–1.76 7.0 1.88 1.41–2.52 3.3
4 Lifestyled 1.42 1.13–1.78 2.3 1.77 1.33–2.36 15.4
5 Disability, comorbidity e 1.38 1.10–1.74 11.6 1.88 1.41–2.50 3.3
6 Self-rated health status f 1.40 1.12–1.77 7.0 1.81 1.36–2.42 11.0
7 Full model g 1.36 1.07–1.65 16.3 1.72 1.27–2.32 20.9
  1. % excess risk explained is calculated by [(OR base – OR adj) /(OR base – 1)]*100.
  2. a adjusted for age, gender, and time.
  3. b adjusted for factors in base model plus race, education, family income, health care accessibility, and marital status.
  4. c adjusted for factors in base model plus occupation, work status (full time vs. part time), number of working hours per week, job tenure.
  5. d adjusted for factors in base model plus smoking, obesity, exercise, alcohol or substance abuse problem.
  6. e adjusted for factors in base model plus any activity limitation at work, house, or school due to medical condition, cognitive function impairment, and comorbidity.
  7. f adjusted for factors in base model plus self-rated perceived physical, mental health status.
  8. g Fully adjusted using risk factors from all models.