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Table 5 Interaction effects between single motherhood and stress on moderate and heavy smoking pattern

From: The effect of psychosocial stress on single mothers’ smoking

  Moderate smoking Heavy smoking
High psychosocial stress due to… OR CI 95% OR CI 95%
financial worries * single motherhood 1.37 0.82-2.27 0.88 0.48-1.59
career situation/unemployment * single motherhood 0.76 0.45-1.29 1.02 0.56-1.87
conflicts with the partner or ex-partner * single motherhood 0.79 0.44-1.39 0.82 0.43-1.56
sole responsibility for the child/ren * single motherhood 0.46 0.27-0.78 0.83 0.44-1.54
child-rearing difficulties * single motherhood 0.74 0.41-1.33 0.92 0.49-1.70
unwanted living alone/loneliness * single motherhood 0.39 0.16-0.97 0.40 0.17-0.95
little recognition of family work * single motherhood 0.47 0.25-0.89 0.52 0.27-0.97
a family member in need of care * single motherhood 0.60 0.18-2.02 0.91 0.33-2.45
conflicts with other family members * single motherhood 0.37 0.14-0.96 0.83 0.37-1.84
household requirements * single motherhood 0.32 0.18-0.59 0.66 0.36-1.22
family demands * single motherhood 0.45 0.26-0.76 0.49 0.27-0.90
a disabled or chronically ill child * single motherhood 0.18 0.04-0.83 1.08 0.34-3.44
balancing family and job demands * single motherhood 0.33 0.18-0.62 0.85 0.44-1.62
  1. Notes: Results of logistic regression analysis adjusted for single motherhood (main effect), mother’s age and age of youngest child. Bold values indicate significant effects. See Table 3 for explanations of abbreviations.