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Table 1 Demographic, economic, inequality, and social support in Sweden, the Netherlands, Canada, the United States, and Cuba

From: A comparative analysis of early child health and development services and outcomes in countries with different redistributive policies

  Sweden Netherlands Canada United States Cuba
Political tradition (1950–2000) [4] Social democratic parties Christian democratic parties or conservative parties in Judeo-Christian tradition Liberal parties or conservative parties of a liberal persuasion Liberal parties or conservative parties of a liberal persuasion Conservative dictatorship
Population, 2011 (millions) [11, 12] 9.4 16.7 33.9 313.2 11.3
Population density (people per square kilometer of land), 2010 [12] 22.9 492.6 3.8 33.8 105.8
Immigrants (foreign born population), 2009 [11, 12] 14.4% 11.1% 19.6% 12.7% 0.1%
GDP (output approach, USD, current prices and PPP*), 2010 (billions) [9, 11] $369.0 $701.0 $1,332.6 $14,447.1 $114.1
GDP per capita (US dollars, current prices and PPP*), 2010 [9, 11] $39,345 $42,218 $39,049 $46,587 $9,900
Gini coefficient level late 2000s, 2010 [11, 14] 0.26 0.29 0.32 0.38 0.5**
IHDI (2011) [15] 0.851 0.846 0.829 0.771 0.776***
Tax revenue (taxes on income, profits and capital gains as a % of GDP), 2009 [9, 11] 46.7% 38.2% 32.0% 34.3% 75.8%
Public expenditures on family as a % of GDP, 2007 [11]      
Cash benefits 1.5% 0.6% 0.8% 0.1% No equivalent data available
Benefits in kind 1.9% 1.4% 0.2% 0.6%
Total 3.4% 2.0% 1.0% 0.7%
Public expenditure on child care and early education services as a % of GDP, 2007 [60] 1.1% 0.7% 0.2% 0.4% No equivalent data available
Health insurance funding Government Private, children have free insurance Government Private with some government Government
  1. *Purchasing power parity.
  2. **Interpret with caution as data source is not verifiable.
  3. ***Unadjusted for inequality.