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Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

A prospective study of dietary selenium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes

  • Saverio Stranges1Email author,
  • Sabina Sieri2,
  • Marco Vinceti3,
  • Sara Grioni2,
  • Eliseo Guallar4, 5,
  • Martin Laclaustra4, 5,
  • Paola Muti6,
  • Franco Berrino7 and
  • Vittorio Krogh2
BMC Public Health201010:564

https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2458-10-564

Received: 21 May 2010

Accepted: 21 September 2010

Published: 21 September 2010

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
21 May 2010 Submitted Original manuscript
7 Jun 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Qi Sun
9 Jun 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Simin Liu
14 Jun 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Lisa Rafalson
19 Jun 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - mario siervo
13 Jul 2010 Author responded Author comments - Saverio Stranges
Resubmission - Version 2
13 Jul 2010 Submitted Manuscript version 2
8 Aug 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - mario siervo
17 Aug 2010 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Simin Liu
13 Sep 2010 Author responded Author comments - Saverio Stranges
Resubmission - Version 3
13 Sep 2010 Submitted Manuscript version 3
21 Sep 2010 Author responded Author comments - Saverio Stranges
Resubmission - Version 4
21 Sep 2010 Submitted Manuscript version 4
Publishing
21 Sep 2010 Editorially accepted
21 Sep 2010 Article published 10.1186/1471-2458-10-564

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Health Sciences Research Institute, University of Warwick Medical School, Coventry, UK
(2)
Nutritional Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy
(3)
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Modena, Italy
(4)
Departments of Epidemiology and Medicine, and Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, USA
(5)
Department of Cardiovascular Epidemiology and Population Genetics, National Center for Cardiovascular Research (CNIC), Madrid, Spain
(6)
Epidemiology and Prevention Unit, "Regina Elena" Italian National Cancer Institute, Rome, Italy
(7)
Etiological and Preventive Epidemiology Unit, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan, Italy

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