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Consumption patterns of sweet drinks in a population of Australian children and adolescents (2003–2008)

  • Britt W Jensen1, 2, 3Email author,
  • Melanie Nichols4,
  • Steven Allender4, 5,
  • Andrea de Silva-Sanigorski6,
  • Lynne Millar4,
  • Peter Kremer7,
  • Kathleen Lacy4 and
  • Boyd Swinburn4
BMC Public Health201212:771

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-12-771

Received: 12 March 2012

Accepted: 30 August 2012

Published: 12 September 2012

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
12 Mar 2012 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
Resubmission - Version 3
Submitted Manuscript version 3
20 Apr 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Kyoko Miura
7 May 2012 Reviewed Reviewer Report - Shu Wen Ng
29 Jun 2012 Author responded Author comments - Britt Wang Jensen
Resubmission - Version 4
29 Jun 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 4
23 Jul 2012 Author responded Author comments - Britt Wang Jensen
Resubmission - Version 5
23 Jul 2012 Submitted Manuscript version 5
Publishing
30 Aug 2012 Editorially accepted
12 Sep 2012 Article published 10.1186/1471-2458-12-771

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Research Unit for Dietary Studies, Institute of Preventive Medicine, Copenhagen Capital Region, Copenhagen University Hospital
(2)
Centre for Research in Childhood Health, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark
(3)
Centre for Intervention Research in Health Promotion and Disease Prevention (previous: Centre for Applied Research in Health Promotion and Prevention), The National Institute of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark
(4)
WHO Collaborating Centre for Obesity Prevention, Deakin University
(5)
Department of Public Health, University of Oxford
(6)
Melbourne School of Population Health, University of Melbourne
(7)
School of Psychology, Deakin University

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