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The mPED randomized controlled clinical trial: applying mobile persuasive technologies to increase physical activity in sedentary women protocol

  • Yoshimi Fukuoka1Email author,
  • Judith Komatsu2,
  • Larry Suarez3,
  • Eric Vittinghoff4,
  • William Haskell5,
  • Tina Noorishad2 and
  • Kristin Pham2
BMC Public Health201111:933

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-933

Received: 28 October 2011

Accepted: 14 December 2011

Published: 14 December 2011

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Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com.

Original Submission
28 Oct 2011 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
1 Nov 2011 Author responded Author comments - Yoshimi Fukuoka
Resubmission - Version 3
1 Nov 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 3
1 Nov 2011 Author responded Author comments - Yoshimi Fukuoka
Resubmission - Version 4
1 Nov 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 4
Resubmission - Version 5
Submitted Manuscript version 5
7 Dec 2011 Author responded Author comments - Yoshimi Fukuoka
Resubmission - Version 6
7 Dec 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 6
Publishing
14 Dec 2011 Editorially accepted
14 Dec 2011 Article published 10.1186/1471-2458-11-933

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting info@biomedcentral.com. All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Institute for Health & Aging, Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of California, San Francisco
(2)
Institute for Health & Aging, University of San Francisco
(3)
Information Services Unit, University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine
(4)
Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, University of California
(5)
Stanford Prevention Research Center, School of Medicine, Stanford University

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