Skip to main content


Open Access
Open Peer Review

This article has Open Peer Review reports available.

How does Open Peer Review work?

Protocol for the ADDITION-Plus study: a randomised controlled trial of an individually-tailored behaviour change intervention among people with recently diagnosed type 2 diabetes under intensive UK general practice care

  • Simon J Griffin1Email author,
  • Rebecca K Simmons1,
  • Kate M Williams2,
  • A Toby Prevost3,
  • Wendy Hardeman2,
  • Julie Grant2,
  • Fiona Whittle2,
  • Sue Boase2,
  • Imogen Hobbis2,
  • Soren Brage1,
  • Kate Westgate1,
  • Tom Fanshawe2,
  • Stephen Sutton2,
  • Nicholas J Wareham1,
  • Ann Louise Kinmonth2 and
  • the ADDITION-Plus study team
BMC Public Health201111:211

DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-211

Received: 11 March 2011

Accepted: 4 April 2011

Published: 4 April 2011

Back to article

Open Peer Review reports

Pre-publication versions of this article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting

Original Submission
11 Mar 2011 Submitted Original manuscript
Resubmission - Version 2
Submitted Manuscript version 2
28 Mar 2011 Author responded Author comments - Rebecca Simmons
Resubmission - Version 3
28 Mar 2011 Submitted Manuscript version 3
4 Apr 2011 Editorially accepted
4 Apr 2011 Article published 10.1186/1471-2458-11-211

How does Open Peer Review work?

Open peer review is a system where authors know who the reviewers are, and the reviewers know who the authors are. If the manuscript is accepted, the named reviewer reports are published alongside the article. Pre-publication versions of the article and author comments to reviewers are available by contacting All previous versions of the manuscript and all author responses to the reviewers are also available.

You can find further information about the peer review system here.

Authors’ Affiliations

MRC Epidemiology Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital
General Practice and Primary Care Research Unit, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge
Department of Primary Care and Public Health Sciences, King's College London